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2 Ideas for Custom Railings

Site-built deck rails use unconventional materials to preserve the view

Factory-built deck-rail systems are available at home centers, but there are advantages to custom designs: They can be cheaper, they can display craft and skill, and they can reflect a homeowner's taste and style perfectly. Managing editor Debra Judge Silber looks at two custom deck railings, one by Maryland builder Clemens Jellema and one from North Carolina builder Michael Chandler. Jellema's deck has nautical features, such as a top rail wrapped with marine-grade roping, and tempered-glass balusters that allow views to the nearby woods and river. Chandler's design features agricultural wire ("goat panels") instead of traditional balusters and rope lights tucked under the top rails.

From Fine Homebuilding221 , pp. 50-53 July 14, 2011