previous
  • Video: Install a Fence
    Video: Install a Fence
  • Basement Remodeling Tips
    Basement Remodeling Tips
  • Clever daily tip in your inbox
    Clever daily tip in your inbox
  • 7 Smart Kitchen Solutions
    7 Smart Kitchen Solutions
  • 7 Small Bathroom Layouts
    7 Small Bathroom Layouts
  • 7 Trim Carpentry Secrets
    7 Trim Carpentry Secrets
  • Design Inspiration
    Design Inspiration
  • Remodeling Articles
    Remodeling Articles
  • 9 Concrete Countertops Ideas
    9 Concrete Countertops Ideas
  • Magazine Departments
    Magazine Departments
  • Read FHB on Your iPad
    Read FHB on Your iPad
  • Tips & Techniques for Painting
    Tips & Techniques for Painting
  • All about Roofing
    All about Roofing
  • Master Carpenter Videos
    Master Carpenter Videos
  • Video Series: Tile a Bathroom
    Video Series: Tile a Bathroom
  • Energy-Smart Details
    Energy-Smart Details
  • Radiant Heat Comparison
    Radiant Heat Comparison
next
Pin It

How it Works: Roof Trusses

The roofs on most new houses in the United States are built with trusses. In this "How It Works" column, structural engineer Rob Munach explains how trusses carry their loads and how T-bracing and roof sheathing add strength. He identifies the different parts of a truss--top chord, bottom chord, web, and nail plates--and how each functions. An illustration shows the compression and tension ratings of a truss that has been modeled with a combined dead, live, and snow load of 40 lb. per sq. ft. Munach stresses that because trusses are built with no redundancy, cutting them can have consequences ranging from damage to interior finishes and materials to catastrophic roof failure. Another illustration shows how cutting the web of a truss increases the deflection potential of the bottom chord.

From Fine Homebuilding225 , pp. 18-19