previous
  • Deck Design & Construction
    Deck Design & Construction
  • Read FHB on Your iPad
    Read FHB on Your iPad
  • Energy-Smart Details
    Energy-Smart Details
  • The Passive House Build
    The Passive House Build
  • 7 Smart Kitchen Solutions
    7 Smart Kitchen Solutions
  • 12 Remodeling Secrets
    12 Remodeling Secrets
  • Magazine Departments
    Magazine Departments
  • Clever daily tip in your inbox
    Clever daily tip in your inbox
  • Buyer's Guide to Insulation
    Buyer's Guide to Insulation
  • Electrical Articles & Videos
    Electrical Articles & Videos
  • Master Carpenter Videos
    Master Carpenter Videos
  • Play the Inspector Game!
    Play the Inspector Game!
  • Video: Build a curved step
    Video: Build a curved step
  • How to Install Housewrap Solo
    How to Install Housewrap Solo
  • Shorten a Prehung Door
    Shorten a Prehung Door
  • The Hobbit House and More
    The Hobbit House and More
  • 7 Small Bathroom Layouts
    7 Small Bathroom Layouts
  • 9 Concrete Countertops Ideas
    9 Concrete Countertops Ideas
  • Tips & Techniques for Painting
    Tips & Techniques for Painting
  • Basement Remodeling Tips
    Basement Remodeling Tips
  • 7 Trim Carpentry Secrets
    7 Trim Carpentry Secrets
  • Remodeling in Action
    Remodeling in Action
  • All about Roofing
    All about Roofing
next
Pin It

How to Provide Makeup Air for Range Hoods

If your kitchen has a powerful exhaust fan, it may be making your indoor air worse

Range hoods are a necessity for evacuating kitchens of the smoke and odors that can accompany cooking. Most of the time, the indoor air the hood is exhausting is replaced by air entering the house through random spaces around doors, windows, or mudsills. With some big appliances and in tightly built, energy-efficient houses, though, range hoods can be detrimental because they have no air leaks to draw from. That can lead to the danger of backdrafting, or the introducing of exhaust gases from flues and chimneys. In this article, senior editor Martin Holladay outlines various solutions that allow range hoods to function well in tightly built houses. You can bring makeup air into a tight house in three ways: through the HVAC system using dampers; through wall- or ceiling-mounted grilles; or through mechanized makeup-air solutions. Some tight homes also can benefit from the use of a heat-recovery ventilator (HRV) or an energy-recovery ventilator (ERV). Perhaps the most important consideration is to size the range hood properly from the start. A small range hood is often adequate.

How to Provide Makeup Air for Range Hoods

Become a Fine Homebuilding Member

to view this article and over a thousand more

Learn More