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Insulating With Damp-Spray Cellulose

It's cheaper than spray foam, air-seals better than fiberglass, and has more recycled content than both of them

Damp-spray cellulose might not be the first option you consider for insulation, but given its qualities—it's cheaper than spray foam and air-seals better than fiberglass, with R-values comparable to both—you might want to keep it in mind. In this article, Leroy Anderson, the director of construction services for a New York City nonprofit group, explains why he likes damp-spray cellulose, then tells how he installs it in the projects he works on. Anderson says that installing damp-spray cellulose is a relatively low-tech process. One crucial factor is maintaining the proper ratio of moisture to dry cellulose; 25% moisture to 75% cellulose is ideal. A three-member crew is best: An installer mixes the moisture and cellulose, then blows it into wall cavities with it; a second worker uses a tool called a scrubber to level the slightly overfilled cavities; and a third worker vacuums the excess insulation for reuse. Damp-spray cellulose requires about 24 hours to dry before you can install drywall over it. This article includes sidebars about the safety of cellulose insulation and 10 things to know about cellulose insulation.

Insulating With Damp-Spray Cellulose
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