previous
  • Magazine Departments
    Magazine Departments
  • 9 Concrete Countertops Ideas
    9 Concrete Countertops Ideas
  • Video Series: Install a Rock-Solid Tile Floor
    Video Series: Install a Rock-Solid Tile Floor
  • Video: Build a curved step
    Video: Build a curved step
  • 7 Trim Carpentry Secrets
    7 Trim Carpentry Secrets
  • 7 Small Bathroom Layouts
    7 Small Bathroom Layouts
  • Clever daily tip in your inbox
    Clever daily tip in your inbox
  • Remodeling in Action
    Remodeling in Action
  • 12 Remodeling Secrets
    12 Remodeling Secrets
  • Solid Deck-Framing Advice
    Solid Deck-Framing Advice
  • Read FHB on Your iPad
    Read FHB on Your iPad
  • Energy-Smart Details
    Energy-Smart Details
  • Master Carpenter Videos
    Master Carpenter Videos
  • Gallery: Custom Flooring
    Gallery: Custom Flooring
  • Basement Remodeling Tips
    Basement Remodeling Tips
  • Video: Install a Fence
    Video: Install a Fence
  • 7 Smart Kitchen Solutions
    7 Smart Kitchen Solutions
  • Tips & Techniques for Painting
    Tips & Techniques for Painting
  • All about Roofing
    All about Roofing
  • Deck Design & Construction
    Deck Design & Construction
next

The two faces of backerboard

Q: Recently, a friend and I installed some cement backerboard for the tile in his shower, and we came across a dilemma. The backerboard is smooth on one side and rough on the other, and there were no instructions indicating which side should face out. Is there a proper side to face out for cement backerboard?





A: Former associate editor Roe A. Osborn replies: The answer to your question seems to depend on the specific product you’re using (or on whom you ask). According to information in U.S. Gypsum’s Web site (www.usg.com), the smooth side of their Durock product is for mastic, and the rough side is for mortar applications. The textured surface enhances bonding and reduces tile slip.

Jackie Wright of Custom Building Products (www.custombuildingproducts.com), makers of another cement backerboard product called Wonderboard, told me that it makes no difference which side of their product faces out. She added that installing some sheets with the rough side out and some with smooth side out also will not affect the performance of Wonderboard.


From Fine Homebuilding 112, pp. 20 November 1, 1997