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Pin It

Drilling entry holes on glazed tile

I was getting ready to replace a shower-curtain rod in my home with fittings mounted on glazed tile. I wasn’t looking forward to starting a masonry bit on the glazed tile surface because the blunt tip wants to skitter around. It is easy to scratch the surface and end up with a hole that is not where it should be.

It occurred to me that with a rotary-tool grinding bit, I could create a small dimple on the glazed surface, just like I do with a punch in wood when I want precise alignment. It was easy to position the small grinding bit, and I quickly created little dimples on the tile surface exactly where the holes needed to be. The masonry bit then settled right in. Eight holes took about half the time, with half the frustration. The small grinding bit cost all of $3, and I am sure it will last for years and for dozens of holes.