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Shingle-Drying Rack

Finding space for bundles of freshly oiled or stained cedar shingles is always a challenge. Where do you put hundreds of wet shingles so that they can dry properly? I used to string multiple clotheslines next to one another over a drop cloth, and then to affix the shingles to the lines with clothespins. This was effective, but it took a fair amount of space and also a lot of clothespins.  

My new method is even better. As shown in the drawing (left), I slip the wet shingles into the slots created by the slats in a louvered door. You’ll be amazed how many shingles will fit into a single door, each with enough airspace around it to ensure even drying.

 

Incidentally, I do not dip the entire shingle. This takes an exorbitant amount of stain and is unnecessary. I use a 5-gal. bucket with a few inches of stain in it. I dip the bottom of the shingle and brush up to about 8 in. to 10 in., depending on the desired exposure. Then I wipe the excess back into the bucket. With this method, knocking out bundles is fast and easy.