previous
  • Ultimate Deck Build 2015
    Ultimate Deck Build 2015
  • Clever daily tip in your inbox
    Clever daily tip in your inbox
  • 9 Concrete Countertops Ideas
    9 Concrete Countertops Ideas
  • Design Inspiration
    Design Inspiration
  • Magazine Departments
    Magazine Departments
  • 7 Trim Carpentry Secrets
    7 Trim Carpentry Secrets
  • Master Carpenter Videos
    Master Carpenter Videos
  • 7 Smart Kitchen Solutions
    7 Smart Kitchen Solutions
  • Radiant Heat Comparison
    Radiant Heat Comparison
  • Remodeling Articles
    Remodeling Articles
  • Energy-Smart Details
    Energy-Smart Details
  • Tips & Techniques for Painting
    Tips & Techniques for Painting
  • All about Roofing
    All about Roofing
  • Basement Remodeling Tips
    Basement Remodeling Tips
  • Video Series: Tile a Bathroom
    Video Series: Tile a Bathroom
  • Read FHB on Your iPad
    Read FHB on Your iPad
  • 7 Small Bathroom Layouts
    7 Small Bathroom Layouts
  • Video: Install a Fence
    Video: Install a Fence
next
Pin It

Power miter-box jig

On a construction site, a convenient setup for a power miter box saw is essential if the tool is to earn its keep. A good setup must combine easy removal of the saw for secure lock-up, long supports on each side of the saw, easy storage, and a waist-high saw table. My jig, shown in the drawing, allows for lift-off removal of the saw, which means it can be brought to a construction site before the building is enclosed and taken away each night.

Because accurate cuts are so easy to make with one of these saws, inexperienced workers can get excellent results for such tasks as rough framing. If the jig has sufficiently long side boards, a stop for identical-length studs may be fastened to them. I haven't found it necessary to fasten my saw to this jig, but if you want you could insert dowels through the bolt holes in the box into the 2x10.

My 10-in. saw will not quite cut through 2x6 material unless I use one of these two tricks: On 90° cuts, I first bring the saw down through the wood as far as it can go, leaving the last 1/2 in. or so uncut. Then I lift up the front edge of the board to complete the cut. If I am making numerous cuts, or cuts at an angle other than 90°, I fasten a suitable length of 1/2-in. plywood along the side boards and across the saw table in order to jack up the bottom of the lumber up the saw's range.