previous
  • Energy-Smart Details
    Energy-Smart Details
  • 9 Concrete Countertops Ideas
    9 Concrete Countertops Ideas
  • Tips & Techniques for Painting
    Tips & Techniques for Painting
  • Remodeling Articles
    Remodeling Articles
  • Radiant Heat Comparison
    Radiant Heat Comparison
  • 7 Trim Carpentry Secrets
    7 Trim Carpentry Secrets
  • 7 Smart Kitchen Solutions
    7 Smart Kitchen Solutions
  • Clever daily tip in your inbox
    Clever daily tip in your inbox
  • Read FHB on Your iPad
    Read FHB on Your iPad
  • All about Roofing
    All about Roofing
  • Video: Install a Fence
    Video: Install a Fence
  • Magazine Departments
    Magazine Departments
  • Video Series: Tile a Bathroom
    Video Series: Tile a Bathroom
  • Master Carpenter Videos
    Master Carpenter Videos
  • Design Inspiration
    Design Inspiration
  • Basement Remodeling Tips
    Basement Remodeling Tips
  • Custom Flooring Inspiration
    Custom Flooring Inspiration
  • 7 Small Bathroom Layouts
    7 Small Bathroom Layouts
next
Pin It

Precision caulking

Faced with filling numerous nail holes in Azek trim on a recent job, I wasn't looking forward to the task, especially because the wood-grain finish makes excess caulk removal a chore. A caulk gun just isn't controllable enough and makes cleanup tough. I was clearing out the toolbox from my boat when I saw a pack of epoxy syringes, and the light went on. These syringes are about 1/2 in. dia., and the tips can be cut from microscopic to about 1/8 in. The plunger is easily removable, and the barrel can be loaded with caulk from a gun.

Gentle pressure enabled me to place the caulk precisely in the nail hole. A quick wipe with a fingertip removed the small amount of excess without obscuring the wood grain, which would look bad after painting. Three or four refills of the syringe were sufficient for all the trim on a well-adorned three-door garage.

The syringes are readily available at any marine store, such as West Marine, and at many hardware stores that stock epoxy materials. At about $1 a shot, they are an inexpensive way to caulk with precision.

Magazine extra: Watch a video of Chuck Miller demonstrating this tip.