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Pin It

Protective Isolation Membranes

Applying a barrier where deck hardware contacts pressure-treated wood can help both last longer

When the chemicals used to treat lumber changed from CCA (chromated copper arsenate) to ACQ (alkaline copper quaternary) a few years ago, the more corrosive nature of ACQ became evident to deck builders and manufacturers. Even the double thick galvanized coatings on joist hangers and other metal hardware began to corrode unusually fast. A simple way to reduce the corrosion of hangers and hardware is to separate the metal from the treated wood using isolation membranes. In this audio slideshow, builder and contributing editor Mike Guertin shows you the method he uses.

Click on the image below to launch the slideshow.

Photos by: Charles Bickford
From Fine Homebuilding196 January 1, 1900