previous
  • Master Carpenter Videos
    Master Carpenter Videos
  • Energy-Smart Details
    Energy-Smart Details
  • Electrical Articles & Videos
    Electrical Articles & Videos
  • Shorten a Prehung Door
    Shorten a Prehung Door
  • 9 Concrete Countertops Ideas
    9 Concrete Countertops Ideas
  • The Passive House Build
    The Passive House Build
  • All about Roofing
    All about Roofing
  • Clever daily tip in your inbox
    Clever daily tip in your inbox
  • Play the Inspector Game!
    Play the Inspector Game!
  • The Hobbit House and More
    The Hobbit House and More
  • Tips & Techniques for Painting
    Tips & Techniques for Painting
  • Remodeling in Action
    Remodeling in Action
  • How to Install Housewrap Solo
    How to Install Housewrap Solo
  • Buyer's Guide to Insulation
    Buyer's Guide to Insulation
  • 12 Remodeling Secrets
    12 Remodeling Secrets
  • Magazine Departments
    Magazine Departments
  • Read FHB on Your iPad
    Read FHB on Your iPad
  • 7 Small Bathroom Layouts
    7 Small Bathroom Layouts
  • Basement Remodeling Tips
    Basement Remodeling Tips
  • Video: Build a curved step
    Video: Build a curved step
  • Deck Design & Construction
    Deck Design & Construction
  • 7 Trim Carpentry Secrets
    7 Trim Carpentry Secrets
  • 7 Smart Kitchen Solutions
    7 Smart Kitchen Solutions
next
Pin It

Snake Wire Through Old Walls

Don’t let narrow wall cavities filled with plaster prevent you from running new wires

Length: 1:31
Produced By: John Ross, Edited by Cari Delahanty

John Ross from Bethel, Conn., writes:

The walls in my old colonial have only a 1-in. cavity between the two planes of lath, and much of that space is obstructed by plaster keys. When I wanted run new electrical wires, I couldn’t use a snake because it kept getting hung up on the globs of plaster inside the walls. To make a channel for the wire and to provide something to hook the wire to so I could pull it through the wall, I used a 3/16-in. by 1-1/2-in. piece of lath I purchased at the local home store. Now when I want to run wire, I locate were I want my wire to run, either from up top or down below. Then I shove the lath through the cavity, breaking the plaster keys as I go. Because of its shape, the lath keeps to a straight line. It sometimes takes some work to get the lath to an outlet or light-switch location, but once it's there, I simply attach my wire to it and pull it back through the wall.