Save Your Old Paint - Fine Homebuilding
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Theres a Better Way


Save Your Old Paint

comments (2) February 11th, 2010 in Blogs
grateful.ed Chuck Miller, editor at large

Video Length: 1:37
Produced by: John Ross, Edited by Cari Delahanty


 Bob Simpson from Cottage City, MD, writes:

As a painting contractor, I use a lot of paint in 5-gal. buckets. Bits of joint compound and debris from the job site inevitably find their way into the paint, so I strain my paints each day before applying them. I could buy strainers, but I prefer to make my own. Using an old plastic paint bucket with a lid, I lay some window screen across the open bucket top and push it downward with my fist to form the strainer. Next, I cut a big hole in the lid, leaving just the lock ring. Then I snap on the lock ring, and cut the assembled strainer away from the bucket. Presto! I've got a strainer that perfectly fits 5-gal. buckets.



posted in: Blogs, remodeling, restorations, painting

Comments (2)

BernietheHun BernietheHun writes: I have seen cheese cloth, old t-shirts, but especially effective and inexpensive is the cheapest panty-hose you can buy. fitted over a 1 gallon, you can work solo, with a helper holding, one can strain larger volume. Sometimes we double the the panty hose, if the paint is very $$$ high gloss oil-based paint. The technique pictured will not hold enough paint(time consuming)and is not fine enough to trap many small particles. The pictured technique might work for some paint, but would be a waste of time for any paint with a higher sheen than eggshell. Some wheels don't need reinventing. Sometimes old school makes more sense.
Posted: 1:27 pm on February 21st

cutdude2 cutdude2 writes: Genius!
BUT WHY DON'T YOU BUY YOUR PAINT FROM THE PAINT STORE OR LUMBER/PAINT STORE INSTEAD OF FREAKIN' HOME DESPOT!
Posted: 6:53 am on February 21st

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