UPDATED: Win a Tool with Our Podcast Brain Teaser - Fine Homebuilding
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UPDATED: Win a Tool with Our Podcast Brain Teaser

comments (13) May 17th, 2010 in Blogs
Ed_Pirnik Ed Pirnik, producer

On this weeks Lunch Pail Podcast, were giving listeners a chance to win the Milwaukee Job Saw Kit reviewed in our Tool Hound video series recently.Click To Enlarge

On this week's Lunch Pail Podcast, we're giving listeners a chance to win the Milwaukee Job Saw Kit reviewed in our Tool Hound video series recently.

Photo: Milwaukee Tools

UPDATE - May 14, 2010 - 4:30 p.m. (EST): The winner of the Milwaukee Job Saw Kit is user, toolman617. Congratulations!

This week on the Lunch Pail Podcast, I was left guestless! Shocking, I know, but the fact of the matter is, our editors have been burning the midnight oil while working on a new special issue.

Your Correct Answer Could Win You a New Tool!
But all is not lost, fellow tool junkies. Since no one was on-hand to appear on the podcast this week, I decided to pose a construction-related brain teaser. Listen to the podcast and if you think you've got the right answer, enter it into the comments section at the bottom of this blog post. We'll be selecting one of the correct answers at random, and that listener will become the proud new owner of the Milwaukee Job Saw Kit reviewed by senior editor Justin Fink in a recent episode of our Tool Hound video series.

You can listen to the podcast using the simple player below, or just click on the Lunch Pail Podcast logo for a link to our iTunes feed.

 


Episode 10 - May 7, 2010

 
So put your thinking caps on and get to work. The answer to this question isn't as far-fetched as it might seem. Enjoy yourselves and be sure to tune in next week, when we'll announce the winner!

 

 

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posted in: Blogs, timber-frame, lunch pail podcast, timberframe

Comments (13)

jross56922 jross56922 writes: Easy enough, 2 options, using the drill to turn the alt. may be somewhat difficult, the nut on the end of the alt is usally takes a 3/4" socket or 7/8" socket. Chucking that up in a drill could present a problem, but I'll give him possible. The best and quickest way is to use the jumper cables connect to the DC side of the gen and jump start you vehicle. This would take a bit to charge the batt but would work. The possibility of turning a wheel and popping the clutch???? wouldn't work, think how a diff. on a car works, it slips, so one would have to have a solid axle or maybe a posi diff would work, but to use the gen to turn a wheel and engine through the diff and trans, not likely, too much friction. Just a thought.
Posted: 7:11 pm on May 24th

Ed_Pirnik Ed_Pirnik writes: Hi folks: It's 3:20 p.m. (EST) here and we're recording the podcast. So look for a winner later today! Cheers and thanks for commenting.
Posted: 3:21 pm on May 14th

BioBill BioBill writes: Make sure the truck is in neutral, and turned on. Use the drill (powered by the generator) with necessary socket to spin the drive shaft if possible, if necessary socket or clearance not available, try the alternator/generator. If turning the engine presents too much of a load, then take the belt off and charge the battery, replace the belt, and go.
Posted: 1:22 pm on May 14th

rongo rongo writes: I'd use the drill to rotate the alternator, powering the drill with the site generator. Of coures, the drive belt should be disconnected to do this. If memory serves me correctly, alternators are not direction-sensitive, since they generate AC voltage which is then sent to a bridge rectifier for conversion to DC.

Ron Godbout
Northfield, NH
Posted: 12:24 pm on May 14th

saddletrampp saddletrampp writes: if the car battery you mention is a second one, he could jump off that.if not use the 12v side of the genny - scott
Posted: 7:52 pm on May 13th

toolman617 toolman617 writes: The easiest would be if he had a manual transmission - get the car rolling, then drop the clutch and go.

Assuming he doesn't have a manual transmission, making this whole story a rather bland one, the next easiest would be to connect the jumper cables to the 12V side of the generator, then to the battery.

Another solution would be to pull the car's alternator belt off. Judging by the fact you said "decades ago," it had separate drive belts and not a serpentine. Depending on the alternator pulley, you could chuck up a bit of some sort to spin the alternator for a bit to charge the battery. Now if he couldn't get a chuck to work, then he could either take the drive belt or his leather belt, loop it around the drill and the alternator, and spin it for a bit. Basically you're replacing the crankshaft pulley with the drill to spin the alternator. This solution would take care of my inklings to use the aptly mentioned "leather tool belt," depending on what kind of tool belt that is.
Posted: 7:13 pm on May 13th

JimEngr JimEngr writes: Unless the generator also had a 12 VDC output (some portable generators do have an auxiliary output) it would be necessary to use the 120 VAC output to run the 120 VAC drill. Pull the belt that runs the alternator, then use the drill to spin the alternator enough to charge the battery.

One way - chuck a square socket drive (like a socket extender) into the drill, then use the correct size socket to mate with the nut on the end of the alternator.

Posted: 1:56 pm on May 13th

trolleydrvr trolleydrvr writes: I'll go with ewoodhouse's answer: jumper cables, DC side of the inverter, etc.
Posted: 10:32 am on May 13th

Bozeman Bozeman writes: He made a step down transformer by coiling two extension cords. you have more coils for the source (generator voltage)power to step down the voltage. he could use any conductive materials to wrap the cords around. the coils can't touch and he could jump start the car using approximately 12 volts.
Posted: 5:08 pm on May 10th

dustdeal dustdeal writes: Further out in left field, he jacked up the rear of the truck, threw some timber under the axle to support it, pulled a tire, slung his tool belt around the wheel and then the generator shaft and dropped the clutch! (He could have walked home with all this work).
Posted: 2:57 pm on May 10th

Gabriel_Foto Gabriel_Foto writes: If it were me, I'd plug the drill into the genny and chuck it to the alternator pully. Give it a charge, un-chuck, re-attach the belt and drive home:)
Posted: 11:14 am on May 10th

TheTimberTailor TheTimberTailor writes: I'm going with this method:

He removed the fan belt (2 decades ago vehicles still had 'em) using his socket set. Using the 110v electric drill, powered by the 110v generator, with the appropriate size socket to fit the bolt on the pulley he spins the alternator/generator fast enough and long enough to charge up the battery sufficiently to start the engine. With the battery charged, he puts the belt back on, starts the engine and hits the road for home. Hopefully he at least caught a few fish before work to make the episode worthwhile!
Posted: 12:22 am on May 10th

ewoodhouse ewoodhouse writes: Well, assuming he didn't have a manual transmission and a downhill driveway, I'm guessing that he connected one end of the jumper cables to the DC side of the inverter in the generator, connected the other end to his battery, started the generator, and jumped his truck.
Posted: 2:45 pm on May 8th

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