Framing Super Straight Walls With LSL Studs - Fine Homebuilding
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Framing Super Straight Walls With LSL Studs

comments (0) November 20th, 2010 in Blogs
Matt Risinger Matt Risinger, Blogger

Video Length: 2:15
Produced by: Matt Risinger


Have you ever visited a house and noticed wavy walls?  It's especially apparent when raking light comes in from a high window and it's usually due to 2x4 studs that have twisted or warped.  Studs are a natural product and they can warp or twist either prior to installation and even sometimes post installation.  The frame carpenters will cull the bad ones from the batch but sometimes they get installed by accident. 
  I'm a big fan of this relatively new product from the good folks at Weyerhaueser.  It's an iLevel LSL Stud and they come to the job site perfectly straight and flat (and they stay that way).  We're using them on a Barley & Pfeiffer Architects new home we're building.  They're being used in the kitchen, baths, and home office areas.  Those are areas of the house that typically have cabinets & countertops adjoining walls and even small waves can be very apparent when a straight countertop butts into a wavy wall.  He's my video from the job site.  -Matt Risinger


posted in: Blogs, remodeling, green building, framing, , Recycled, Tall Walls