Shinto Shed - Fine Homebuilding
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Shinto Shed

comments (5) August 12th, 2011 in Project Gallery
corewhore corewhore, member

Click To Enlarge Photo: Charles Walters Photo

This storage shed is a 9' x 12' wood drying shed inspired (loosely) by Ise shrine in Japan.  It was built with reclaimed materials - free jobsite salvage, trash, scrap, and reclaimed 6" x 16" old growth timbers salvaged from a remodel of the original Neustetter's Department Store in downtown Denver.  The heart redwood siding was culled, de-nailed, ripped and rabbeted from semi-rotten 2 x 6 decking.   The steel platform was salvaged from "big job" commercial foundation lagging.  The joists are repurposed unistrut that were dragged out of jobsite rolloffs.  New materials include some steel plate, most fasteners, and all glazing and corrugated galvanized roofing.  

The large overhang was chosen in the early design phase to keep salvage construction materials out of the weather because, you know, one can't just take trash home from the jobsite and throw it away immediately.  No, you have to season it for at least five years.  ("Yeah, but honey, I'm going to build something with it someday!")

 


Design or Plan used: My Own Design - Glenn Montgomery
posted in: Project Gallery, storage, recycle, Japanese style

Comments (5)

johnludvig johnludvig writes: cheap and affordable
Posted: 7:06 am on March 18th

philipmcnabb philipmcnabb writes: Very creative work.. Really good
Posted: 1:34 am on March 16th

mickervine mickervine writes: awesome stuff love dit
Posted: 3:35 am on March 13th

mervindhillon mervindhillon writes: very nice work house looks very durable and neat
Posted: 5:22 am on March 4th

DefenderCSW DefenderCSW writes: Hi

Nice work! I really like the door hardware. Any details on that?

Thanks!
Posted: 9:27 am on August 22nd

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