Patrick's Barn: Framing Continues - Fine Homebuilding
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Editor's Notepad

Editor's Notepad


Patrick's Barn: Framing Continues

comments (3) July 19th, 2011 in Blogs
patrick_mccombe Patrick McCombe, Associate editor

The second floor really stiffened up the framing, so the next project is to frame the shed roof thats to the left of the main building. Its low-slope (4/12 pitch) will make it easier to bring materials up to the the main roof. This single-story space, which was originally going to be fully enclosed, will be left open as a way to reduce costs.
The top of the each post has a big notch to help support the tie-beam at the top of the wall. I was concerned the piers underneath the posts werent exactly level, so I didnt cut the notches before standing the posts. As it turns out, the piers are within a 1/4-in. of each other, so I probably could have cut the notches ahead of time.
Everybody has at least one favorite tool—I have many, including my cordless framing nailer. For situations like this where tripping over an air hose could be a disaster, its tough to beat. This is the newest model. Unfortunately, the fuel cell, which is different than the previous generation, is only sold with a 1000-ct. box of nails, and few places stock them compared to the older style.
The second floor really stiffened up the framing, so the next project is to frame the shed roof thats to the left of the main building. Its low-slope (4/12 pitch) will make it easier to bring materials up to the the main roof. This single-story space, which was originally going to be fully enclosed, will be left open as a way to reduce costs.Click To Enlarge

The second floor really stiffened up the framing, so the next project is to frame the shed roof that's to the left of the main building. Its low-slope (4/12 pitch) will make it easier to bring materials up to the the main roof. This single-story space, which was originally going to be fully enclosed, will be left open as a way to reduce costs.


We've made good progress since my last post. Two weeks ago, Fine Woodworking associate art director Kelly Dunton came over to help me build the beams that support the eave ends of the roof rafters. These are big timbers, each made from a pair of 2x10s and a pair of 2x8s. I put the first together by myself, and having Kelly's help afterward likely saved me from a wrenched back or a dangerous fall.

This past weekend, I got a full day's help from Fine Homebuilding copy editor Don Burgard and Fine Woodworking senior editor Matt Kenney, who helped me build the floor for the main barn's second story. It was a brutal day in the blazing sun. Temperatures were in the high 80s, but it seemed even hotter. I was so grateful for their help. My wife, Carol, who's been photographing the barn's progress, took our son away for the weekend to visit family, so there aren't any pictures of the floor going together, but I did snap a photo after the guys left.

I'm really lucky to work in a place where helping a coworker build a barn in your free time is considered "fun," "interesting," even "a piece of cake." I only hope I can repay all of the many favors I've gotten already.

 

Read more about my barn here.


posted in: Blogs, framing, patrick's barn, storage, workshop

Comments (3)

DonBerg DonBerg writes: I never thought of the fact that girts make good ladders. Nice. And, they are always in the right place at the right time.
Posted: 12:53 pm on July 28th

patrick_mccombe patrick_mccombe writes: Thanks Don.

I'll have to think about that for a while. I've never built a post-frame building before, so I'm learning as I go. I like how the girts make it eay to reach the higher parts of a post-frame building. It makes construction easier.
Posted: 8:17 am on July 26th

DonBerg DonBerg writes: Patrick,

It's looking good. Congratulations.

Is there anything that you'd do differently than the drawings show? Please let me know if you come up with ideas that I can add to the plans. I'd love to make the barn better or easier for future builders.

Don

Posted: 7:00 am on July 22nd

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