The Case of the "Shrinking" New American Home - Fine Homebuilding

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Building Business

Building Business


The Case of the "Shrinking" New American Home

comments (9) September 9th, 2011 in Blogs
FHB_Building_News Richard Defendorf, contributor


A take on architectural modernism, The New American Home 2012, now under construction in Winter Park, Florida, will showcase a number concept products, including an elaborate electronic control and monitoring system.

Insulated concrete forms help bring the exterior walls to R-27. 

Some of the low-voltage wiring that integrates the home’s mechanical, security, audio, video, and lighting systems. 

The New American Home 2012 is design to qualify for Emerald certification under the National Green Building Standard rating system.

A take on architectural modernism, The New American Home 2012, now under construction in Winter Park, Florida, will showcase a number concept products, including an elaborate electronic control and monitoring system.
Click To Enlarge

A take on architectural modernism, The New American Home 2012, now under construction in Winter Park, Florida, will showcase a number concept products, including an elaborate electronic control and monitoring system.

Photo: National Association of Home Builders

 

On an infill lot in Winter Park – one of the tonier communities bordering Orlando, Florida – a well organized construction crew has been applying its skills to The New American Home 2012, a showcase for new materials, fixtures, comfort-control systems, and homebuilding expertise that will be open for tours during the International Builders’ Show in February.

The National Association of Home Builders says that the two-bedroom modernist home is “leaner, greener, smarter than its predecessors.” 

Leaner because it is a mere 4,181 sq. ft., which is still huge for a two-bedroom house (four other rooms in the house can be adapted to a variety of uses, including bedrooms) but is also almost 2,000 sq. ft. smaller than the previous two TNAHs. 

Greener because it is designed to qualify for “Emerald” certification under the National Green Building Standard rating system. 

And smarter because the house is wired with an electronic control and monitoring system. Designed and installed by local firm Architectural Electronics, the system will help operate everything from building’s mechanicals to its lighting, motorized screens, and security.

Built for Florida’s mild winters and semi-tropical summers

Central Florida’s long seasons of mostly nice weather contrast pretty sharply with its summer months, when heat and humidity blanket the state and energy use increases accordingly. TNAH 2012, which includes exterior walls built with insulated concrete forms that offer R-27 thermal resistance, is designed to partially offset those costs. As an Emerald-certification contender, the house must provide energy savings of 60% or more over a comparable structure built to code. 

The project designer, Phil Kean, of Phil Kean Designs, told NAHB that he also is aiming for other green certifications for the home, including a LEED for Homes rating; the Florida Green Building Coalition’s Platinum certification; the Department of Energy’s Energy Star certification; the Florida Yards and Neighborhoods designation; the Florida Water Star designation; the Energy Home Advantage Program; and the DOE’s Builders Challenge.

 


posted in: Blogs, business, energy efficiency, green building

Comments (9)

haundd haundd writes: I am really amazed at all this green crap. Do you arrogant jerks really believe you can save or destroy the planet? If so you really don't have any understanding of the planet, physics or the laws of nature. Why don't you forget all this noise and discuss building topics and leave the judgmental crap about how big peoples homes are to the people who are building and paying for them.

Disgusted with the green planet saving hoax.
Posted: 7:32 pm on September 21st

northbayontario northbayontario writes: Phil Kean is applying for no less than eight certifications than some how designate this very large two bedroom home as green and efficient. If he is successful, then the rating systems are to be blamed. While the home waste energy by being too large, at least it is wasting energy efficiently!
Posted: 7:05 pm on September 20th

AllanLindh AllanLindh writes: In the first place the market is overbuilt. In the second place McMansions are ecological and economic nightmares, with no future in the America of tomorrow. Smaller, better designed, better build homes (think Arts and Crafts cottages) are the future. (Check out tumbleweedhomes.com)

Fine Homebuilding grew out of the fine woodworking tradition of the early 20th century. Time to stop running articles about McMansions that are unnecessary, most of the space of which is unused, and which are impossible to maintain properly unless you are Derek Jeeter.


Posted: 2:14 pm on September 19th

Msg2613 Msg2613 writes: Well, it IS a showcase home; that makes it more of a product and tech showcase than a model for the broad market. That said, it would be nice to see something that reflects the larger market and is more in-line with what the majority of homeowners actually purchase.

Posted: 7:24 am on September 19th

Msg2613 Msg2613 writes: Well, it IS a showcase home; that makes it more of a product and tech showcase than a model for the broad market. That said, it would be nice to see something that reflects the larger market and is more in-line with what the majority of homeowners actually purchase.

Posted: 7:24 am on September 19th

brannigan3 brannigan3 writes: I agree with Gobs. I am building a new ICF home in Nova Scotia for my wife and myself, 2 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath, full basement, and the finished living area is 1150 square feet over two floors. This is still bigger than some classic homes from the 30's and 40's. The US home building industry still has a lot to learn and the public has to scale down their expectations. Are we really committed to lessening our impact on this poor old earth of ours or not?
Posted: 6:29 am on September 19th

ArchBuildInt ArchBuildInt writes: The home is smaller than most on the street. It will use less than $2000 a year to heat/cool and power the home. With up to 10000 people in 4 days touring the home the home is almost too small.
Posted: 7:55 am on September 13th

pootis pootis writes: Have to agree - love to look at houses that can afford excess in design but the practical side should slap them down for calling this efficient. It's excessive!
I know it's the rating systems that should be ovehauled...
Posted: 11:16 am on September 12th

Gobs Gobs writes: "..it is a mere 4,181 sq. ft.."? That's still very large. Our family has lived in a 1,300 s.f. home for 35 years, and it's been just fine. Twice as much space, at 2,600 s.f. would be HUGE!! But 4,181 s.f. qualifies as "mere"? That's insulting to everyone's intelligence.
Posted: 10:59 am on September 12th

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