Best Small Home 2014: How to Live Well With Less - Fine Homebuilding

Learn more about Member benefits

Best Small Home 2014: How to Live Well With Less

comments (0) April 22nd, 2014 in Blogs
See more photos and watch a video about this and all of the award-winning homes at FineHomebuilding.com/housesClick To Enlarge

See more photos and watch a video about this and all of the award-winning homes at FineHomebuilding.com/houses


At 1,000 square feet smaller than the average custom home, this compact house is comfortable, practical and attainable

At roughly 1600 sq. ft., this year's best small home was designed by Anne Callender of Whipple-Callender Architects. Callender's article "How to Live Well With Less" shows that downsizing doesn't have to come with sacrifices in style, comfort, and good living. Practical planning is everything. A new stair tower blocks the backyard and the deck from public view, and it helps to streamline the arrangement of the main living spaces. The front-to-back sequence of living room, dining room, and kitchen is typical of shotgun-style homes or industrial lofts. The lack of interior walls allows the spaces to be defined by art and furnishings, giving the owners ongoing flexibility. Callender offers nine solutions to optimize small spaces: Designing with 9-ft. ceilings adds volume to narrow floor plans; placing stairs strategically provides daylight access and views; flexible spaces allow homeowners to react to changing lifestyle demands; see-through items-such as a kitchen island or a transom-provide extended views through small spaces; open, shotgun-style floor plans offer shared views and daylight, and they allow defined living spaces to expand as needed; big-house features-such as multiple bedrooms, bathrooms, and office space-ensure living without compromise; adequate storage space relieves the burden on main living areas, enabling them to remain open and free of clutter; providing access to outdoor living areas in narrow floor plans increases the perception of space and improves comfort; monochromatic finishes make small spaces feel larger and contiguous by blurring their boundaries.

Become a Fine Homebuilding Member

to view this article and over a thousand more

Learn More

posted in: Blogs, architecture

Comments (0)

Become a Fine Homebuilding Member to join the conversation and post a comment.
Already an Member? Log in.