floating countertop - Fine Homebuilding

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floating countertop

comments (3) January 21st, 2009 in Project Gallery
Huck Huck, member

The countertop sits on a small base cabinet at one end, and is supported by a welded square-tube steel brace on the other.
I worried some during construction, but it turned out to be extremely rigid.
When laying out the tile, we decided it would be more user-friendly if we clipped the corner at 45 degrees, a last-minute change made with a reciprocating saw (sawzall). 
Here you can see the steel brace lagged into the stud prior to sheetrock.
Torsion-box type construction served to stiffen the countertop.
Here you can see the countertop mounted in place.
The tile base was cement, troweled in place.  The grooves are from the screeds - small strips of wood leveled front to back, and with each other.
The countertop sits on a small base cabinet at one end, and is supported by a welded square-tube steel brace on the other.
I worried some during construction, but it turned out to be extremely rigid.
When laying out the tile, we decided it would be more user-friendly if we clipped the corner at 45 degrees, a last-minute change made with a reciprocating saw (sawzall). Click To Enlarge

The countertop sits on a small base cabinet at one end, and is supported by a welded square-tube steel brace on the other.

I worried some during construction, but it turned out to be extremely rigid.

When laying out the tile, we decided it would be more user-friendly if we clipped the corner at 45 degrees, a last-minute change made with a reciprocating saw (sawzall). 


"Floating" countertop, for a handicap bathroom addition.  No visible means of support on one end - for easy wheelchair access.

The architect had drawn a wood panel for support at the end, but I wanted to give the wheelchair more room and freedom to approach the sink.


Design or Plan used: My own design - Bakersfield Remodel
posted in: Project Gallery, remodeling, bathroom, additions, countertops, craftsman, tilework

Comments (3)

Huck Huck writes: I agree with the above comments. The plumbing was one of the last items completed, and in the rush, I didn't even give it a thought. By that time the h.o. had abused any good will left, so I just wanted to get paid and get out of there.

I returned a short time later for a few punch list items, and was saddened to see that his handicapped son had not moved in - instead, he was using the room for keeping his two puppies! The thousand dollar carpet reeked of dog pee! Sad.
Posted: 12:45 pm on August 12th

swdstmkr73 swdstmkr73 writes: Or even some chrome drain pipes would be nicer than the plastic.
Posted: 8:37 am on June 15th

semar semar writes: a tiled cover for the drainpipes would be nice
Posted: 9:18 pm on May 23rd

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