How to Build a Built-up Cornice - Fine Homebuilding
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How to Build a Built-up Cornice

comments (0) February 17th, 2009
Order of installation: (1) Plywood cleats, (2) Plywood L-blocking, (3) Soffit, (4) Fascia, (5) Frieze, (6) Bed, (7) Ceiling frieze, (8) Crown
Some crown profiles have fine details that would be lost if scribed.
A better example has plenty of surface that won’t show the scribe.
Order of installation: (1) Plywood cleats, (2) Plywood L-blocking, (3) Soffit, (4) Fascia, (5) Frieze, (6) Bed, (7) Ceiling frieze, (8) CrownClick To Enlarge

Order of installation: (1) Plywood cleats, (2) Plywood L-blocking, (3) Soffit, (4) Fascia, (5) Frieze, (6) Bed, (7) Ceiling frieze, (8) Crown


by Joe Milicia

Although the combinations are nearly infinite, most complex cornice designs share common parts. Components can
be added or subtracted, depending on the scale and size desired. In this particular design, I added backing trim on the ceiling that mirrors the frieze below and gives the crown a place to land. The numbers on each part indicate the order of installation.

Order of installation

cornice anatomy
(1) Plywood cleats, (2) Plywood L-blocking, (3) Soffit, (4) Fascia, (5) Frieze, (6) Bed, (7) Ceiling frieze, (8) Crown


Keep scribes in mind when choosing crown molding

If a particular design calls for the crown to meet the ceiling, I pick a molding profile that has a meaty top edge. The extra material gives me something to scribe to an uneven ceiling.

crown profile crown profile
Some crown profiles have fine details that would be lost if scribed.   A better example has plenty of surface that won’t show the scribe.

 

To learn more, read Mastering Complex Crown from Fine Homebuilding issue #182, pp.66-71.


posted in: finish carpentry

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