Muirkirk Hand Cut - Fine Homebuilding
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Roof Framing Contest


Muirkirk Hand Cut

comments (3) August 25th, 2009 in Project Gallery
Timuhler Timuhler, member

This is a shot of the roof nearly complete.  It took us 2 weeks to frame and sheathe.  The highest ridge was about 30 off the deck if I remember correctly. 
The roof was all 12-12 which made it easy to cut.  Nearly all of it was calculated on the ground including the broken hips and even the king hip to valley jack(s). 
This house had 2 octagon bays.  I calculated and precut them before we got up there to frame them. 
The longest rafters were from 29 stock, but I used LVL for those, and they were not light!!
Another view showing the broken hip framing.  Also the shed dormer was framed back to a glulam that spanned the great room.  From the beam down to a beam in the hallway defined the great room vault with the bump up at the shed dormer.
We framed in a barrel vault in the entry and then a cove ceiling in the dining room.  The dining room had 14 ceilings.  There was also a hip tray in the master.  Our finish carpenter installed a lot of trim, wainscoting and a coffered ceiling in the kitchen.
Front elevation.
This is a shot of the roof nearly complete.  It took us 2 weeks to frame and sheathe.  The highest ridge was about 30 off the deck if I remember correctly. 
The roof was all 12-12 which made it easy to cut.  Nearly all of it was calculated on the ground including the broken hips and even the king hip to valley jack(s). Click To Enlarge

This is a shot of the roof nearly complete.  It took us 2 weeks to frame and sheathe.  The highest ridge was about 30' off the deck if I remember correctly. 

The roof was all 12-12 which made it easy to cut.  Nearly all of it was calculated on the ground including the broken hips and even the king hip to valley jack(s). 

Photo: Tim Uhler

This house just started out as a rambler with a huge roof that we chose to stick frame instead of truss.  After we got it framed and saw how much attic there was, we framed that in.  The house went from about 2000 sq ft to almost 4000 sq ft.  It had 3 stairways total, one full set up to the bonus room, then another 4 riser set up to a bathroom over the kitchen and then another 4 riser set up to the spare room over the dining room.

We were able to add 1 bedroom + walk in closet, 1 kitchenette, 1 bathroom with 3' shower and then one large room that could be a bedroom, and also the bonus/media room. 

Nearly this entire roof was precut on the ground.  I spent a lot of time with the plans before we started framing and made sure everything was square and parallel.  We did very little recutting, but a whole lot of rafter framing.

You can see all of that here http://picasaweb.google.com/TimothyUhler/Muirkirk?feat=directlink   I lost all my pictures of the framing process but the ones I had already uploaded in a computer crash a few years ago.  I also never did get finished pictures inside even though my parents lived there for 2 years!!

This house generated a lot of positive comments from the neighbors as we framed it.  At the time the oldest guy on our 4 man crew was 28 and I was 27, then the other 2 guys on the crew had been framing for about 6 months and were in their early 20's.  One neighbor told me that he enjoyed the fact that craftsman built this house and not the hacks who just slap things together.

 We had some great water fights on this job too.  A very fun job.


Design or Plan used: Gerry Slick
posted in: Project Gallery, framing, roofs, lumber

Comments (3)

FinishCarpenter2824 FinishCarpenter2824 writes: I agree with Huck, It is sad that cut and stack is becoming a lost art. It seems like most people these days just know how to set trusses and not cut a rafter.
Posted: 9:12 pm on April 27th

Timuhler Timuhler writes: Thanks Huck. It is one of my favorites. It was the first big one we cut and stacked. Before this most of what we framed was much smaller in scope, but it was on those little ones where I got the confidence to trust the math.


Posted: 10:57 pm on August 25th

Huck Huck writes: Tim - that is just awesome. And the photos, too. Really great shots. Its sad that cut-and-stack is becoming such a lost art, it does my heart good to see there are still some young guys like yourself carrying on the tradition. If I were the judge, this project is a winner!
Posted: 8:46 pm on August 25th

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