Lawrence

Lawrence Winterburn, Toronto, ON, CA
member


Lawrence
Founder of GardenStructure.com

Lawrence has been building for more than 20 years. Renovations, new construction, cabinetry, commercial, p-lam, trim, exterior, ceramic tile.

GardenStructure.com has about 25 licensed locations operating within their system.

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GardenStructure Deck pt.1

GardenStructure Deck pt.1

Designed for a home on the St. Lawrence this stunning deck is nearly identical to the original concept I pitched. This nearly never happens.  It is a little more than 2100 sq' and all the...

GardenStructure Deck pt.2

GardenStructure Deck pt.2

This is the east portion of the deck on the St. Lawrence. The tub was obviously a central design element, with a bit of vertical interest provided by the pergola. A loose privacy screen towards the...

Pergolas 2

Pergolas 2

These pergolas were designed by Lawrence Winterburn and installed through GardenStructure.com. Unless otherwise noted they were actually built by Lawrence Winterburn and his crew.

Pergolas 1

Pergolas 1

These are a few of the pergolas I have designed over the years. These days our builders deal with the site work, I just dream them up, feed details and the guys put them together. I work with clients...

Decks 1

Decks 1

Rather Large Deck with pergola, hot tub, privacy screen, big steps and curved sections, curved tempered glass hand rail. Designed by Lawrence and built by our builder in Cornwall



Recent comments


Re: Pneumatic Framing Nailers: Why Choose Coil over Stick?

Colin and Justin--

I have always used Bostich coils because they are spiral and the holding power is better when it comes to framing. The second consideration is for nailing decking and framing on cedar they tend to leave a nice clean footprint when compared with many stick nailers that may have clipped head or bits of plastic protruding.

We often use nails for decking since nails can be set deeper for refinishing later...

L

Re: Play Fine Homebuilding's Game "The Inspector"

ON the deck puzzle...
In our area hardhats are mandatory. Bolts must secure the ledger to the house frame normally from the inside on second level decks. The flashing method these guys used was shoddy.

Location of these securing bolts are paramount (staggered in the central 1/3 of the open joist space on ledger--not that any building inspector knows that--this is the single best way of not having a deck fall off a house), and building brackets such as joist hangers are always required to reinforce the connection.

many areas are mandating a specialized bracket at the outer ends of the deck to secure to the dwelling.

L

Re: Synthetic Decking: Best Buy or Absolute Nightmare?

Rob-- Nice Post!

I would love to read through all the comments, but I will have to do this in 2 or 3 meals.

I've been writing about this from time to time on my blogs and have had conversations with hundreds of people that bought composites and now regret it...

Take a look here.

http://decks-fences.blogspot.com/2009/01/trex-class-action-lawsuit-2009.html

http://decks-fences.blogspot.com/search?q=composite

The part that galls me is that their warranty excludes mold, fading as well as labor and disposal costs of the defective composite lumber should they choose to replace it. They dump it in the driveway, make the customer sign a confidentiality and scurry away.

Lawrence Winterburn
www.gardenstructure.com

Re: Housing Recovery: Are We There Yet?

Ontario Canada- A brisk spring reminicent of pre-financial crisis and in late June leads slowed to a trickle due to an 8% tax increase in Ontario (HST- Harmonized Sales Tax). Our ignorant leaders decided that when unemployment is at 9% it is a fine time for a tax grab.

We dominate the web in many places and I am thankful that the majority of our builders are booked months in advance. If we had not been marketing consistently on line for years we would have been in trouble today. I am hoping the tax reaction blows over by September.

Florida is still very price conscious and much of the US seems to be risk adverse. Builders are not investing in their businesses because they don't know what to expect.

Our builder in Los Angeles is strong--but that I think is just sheer numbers.

Much of the US seems also to be suffering from very low wage competition for builders.

In short... we are doing fine, however we have very low expectations. We are biding time until the economy improves all across North America.

Lawrence Winterburn
www.gardenstructure.com

Re: How To Drill Pilot Holes Without a Bit

When stuck for a drill bit a finish nail often works surprisingly well also. It is flexible enough to outlast many proper drill bits and has a sharp tapered edge as well.

L

Re: Bark Side Up or Bark Side Down?

Most of our decks and pergolas are pre-finished... all 6 sides.
Orientation doesn't matter when the materials are kiln dried to start with and sealed. It won't absorb moisture.. it won't expand and contract... it won't tear stain due to expansion.

Keep stain on it and the boards don't cup... ever.

photo at www.decks-fences.blogspot.com

ps. I also prefer nails to screws because screws often break if you try to set them deeper to refinish a pressure treated deck.

Re: A Pergola for the Ages

Ross, you know full well I did that design for you-- and for free. Now you claim the design as your own? That is GardenStructure.com copyrighted work. You have stolen our Portfolio, you owe us $12,000 in back fees...

You are a thief.

L

Re: A Pergola for the Ages

Ross, you know damn well I did that design for you-- and for free. Now you claim the design as your own? That is GardenStructure.com copyrighted work. You have stolen our Portfolio, you owe us $12,000 in back fees...

You are a thief.

L

Re: A Pergola for the Ages

Ross, you know damn well I did that design for you-- and for free. Now you claim the design as your own? That is GardenStructure.com copyrighted work. You have stolen our Portfolio, you owe us $12,000 in back fees...

You are a thief.

L

Re: Share your tax tips for contractors

Brian... you are moving too fast. Please re-read your post. Edit Edit Edit! (jeeze, never thought I would be reminding somebody at FH to edit!)

L

Re: GardenStructure Deck pt.2

Quarter sawn Western Red Cedar Kim-- Prefinished.

Thanks.
L

Re: The character of an old house

Restoring something that needs so much work is painful in a number of ways. My place was the pub when they were logging the area in the mid 1850's. An old baloon framed shack really, with a couple of additions.

The painful part is the upset wife living without a kitchen for months because the project turned into more than we bargained for.

The shrieking about the big pile of travertine in the other building that should be in the master shower--the 3' x 4' x 16'pile of beech flooring sitting in the dining room and the computers and desks camping out in the house until I get drywall on in the shop.

There should be a support group for the wives of old home addicts.

L

Re: Can't Find Ready Made Molding - Making Your Own - Custom Crown Molding

Wha? Plaster Crown without horse hair? Interesting concept. Hey... you are not from Europe or the Middle East?

Questions. How do you key in the plaster to the wood backer? Saw kerfs? Can't see in the photo. How do you rough up the back of it, looks like mesh tape you used... when they do that stuff professionally they knock holes in the drywall and the plaster bonds it without fasteners(just nails beneath to hold until it sets. Is that how you are doing it?

I knew a couple of old timers... about 20 years ago they were nearly 90. They showed me how that plaster moulding was done early on. They would build up the backing with rough lumber and leave spaces between the layers of wood for big mouldings. Then they had a trowel the shape of the moulding. They would often have an undermolding which was basically a straight edge to run the trowel along. The trowel also had a shelf beneath to catch the extra plaster. One guy would apply.. the other would drag and touch up.

They showed me how to do chinking without addetives on log homes that would last 40 years too.

Those two must have been geniuses. Things we don't question today they would have dissected and questioned everything.

L

Re: porch railing

It is Red Cedar-- believe it or not that rail was botched and simplified by the contractor. The support base trim was deleted and they put the ballusters in backwards (to save materials no doubt).

I'll post a gallery of rails soon.

We utilize red cedar and often use solid stain because the knots don't bleed through the stain the way many softwood species do.

NEVER use poplar for anything outside. It deteriorates most quickly of any species.

Our site is http://www.gardenstructure.com (click on installations portfolio then decks to see rails).

To see what that rail should have looked like:
http://www.gardenstructure.com/p/Grande_Deck_with_Pergola_Plan.html

L



Re: porch railing

It is Red Cedar-- believe it or not that rail was botched and simplified by the contractor. The support base trim was deleted and they put the ballusters in backwards (to save materials no doubt).

I'll post a gallery of rails soon.

We utilize red cedar and often use solid stain because the knots don't bleed through the stain the way many softwood species do.

NEVER use poplar for anything outside. It deteriorates most quickly of any species.

Our site is http://www.gardenstructure.com (click on installations portfolio then decks to see rails).

To see what that rail should have looked like:
http://www.gardenstructure.com/p/Grande_Deck_with_Pergola_Plan.html

L



Re: Pergolas 1

Sounds like a good idea to me Kate--Thanks for the kind request!

L

Re: Why politicize the magazine?

There is real pressure from the global warming campaign to muzzle anyone not subscribing to their science. It comes down to freedom of thought in my meager mind.

Global Warming activists don't want their science challenged and they really get upset if anyone dares to suggest they may not have the whole picture yet.

I am all for not being limited in a magazine to just the "Safe" issues--that said I won't touch global warming on my blog. It's hard enough keeping things positive with all the trade ussues like unregistered labour and Composites Vs. Wood.

Not worth the risk personally to alienate anyone.

What to publish is a very tough call- I don't envy you.

I have to agree with Ted--It was political long before you burned your hand on it--just the fact that it is a two sided coin makes it so.

L

Re: Decks 1

HI Climb-- good question.

These are stacked laminations and I believe they were roughly 1 3/8" each layer x4 layers per tread. West System Epoxy was used to fasten. Close to clear materials needed to be used.

Rather a large lamination to pull off, some folks may try it in place--Instead we had the Darren measure carefully--then I rendered form dimensions on the computer. I created a map so that he could fasten cleats to the concrete floor in his shop and use them to pull to.

Each set of treads were glued up in 1 go by inserting spacers.

L

Re: Decks 1

HI Climb-- good question.

These are stacked laminations and I believe they were roughly 1 3/8" each layer x4 layers per tread. West System Epoxy was used to fasten. Close to clear materials needed to be used.

Rather a large lamination to pull off, some folks may try it in place--Instead we had the Darren measure carefully--then I rendered form dimensions on the computer. I created a map so that he could fasten cleats to the concrete floor in his shop and use them to pull to.

Each set of treads were glued up in 1 go by inserting spacers.

L

Re: Decks 1

Thanks Huck-- Means a lot from you. I like your work and site as well. Makes me feel good that someone saw the pictures!

L

Re: Cedar deck with glass and steel

I like it-- No critique here. Well orchestrated, good design.
It is a shame that our stuffy building department won't work with cable rails at all. We'd have to put plexi in front to make them legal.

L