TheTimberTailor

Rapid City, SD, US
member


TheTimberTailor
Matt began his construction career in 1972 working for a residential remodeling contractor. After a four year stint doing auto body work on exotic and historic cars, he returned to carpentry; framing and trimming high-end custom homes. These days he is working on specialized residential and light commercial remodeling projects doing business as The Timber Tailor. When not working Matt enjoys hiking, water skiing, rock and ice climbing and exploring in the Black Hills of South Dakota where he lives with his wife of 24 years in a home he built.

Gender: Male

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Contributions

Cherry Fireplace Surround and Overmantle

Cherry Fireplace Surround and Overmantle

The beveled mirror in this cherry surround and overmantle slides up effortlessly with a counterweight to reveal the TV screen hidden behind it.

CNC-Manufactured Framing Replaces Site-Built Custom Dormers

CNC-Manufactured Framing Replaces Site-Built Custom Dormers

Question: What do each of these carpentry disciplines have in common; millwork, windows, cabinets, doors and stairs? Answer: In the not-to-distant past, each of these tasks was performed on-site by highly skilled carpenters. New applications of digital capabilities assure more change is inevitable as shown here with CNC fabrication of complex roof-framing assemblies.

Wall Layout and Framing Basics for Simple Shed Project

Wall Layout and Framing Basics for Simple Shed Project

Accurate wall layout and construction are key to building this sturdy shed project. Get insight into basic wall framing layout and assembly procedures using a SketchUp shed model to understand how plates, studs, headers and cripples become the supporting structure for the roof, siding, door and window.

Begin With the End in Mind: Shed Layout and Floor Framing

Begin With the End in Mind: Shed Layout and Floor Framing

Layout considerations begin before the first board is cut or fastener is driven. Beginning with the end in mind will assure optimal results for your shed project.

A Step Ahead to Build a Shed

A Step Ahead to Build a Shed

Being a step ahead in building a simple shed can help speed up the process. A SketchUp model can give you that step ahead by clarifying the planning, parts and procedure for a very basic yet functional backyard shed.

Graduate from a 3D Modeling Apprenticeship

Graduate from a 3D Modeling Apprenticeship

Finish building 100 stackable sawhorses to complete your Introduction to 3D modeling and graddduate with a degree that's worth exactly what you paid.

A 3D Apprenticeship: Day Two

A 3D Apprenticeship: Day Two

For an apprentice, building a set of sawhorses is a great way to learn use of basic tools to mark, measure and cut. It can teach a 3D modeller equally worthwhile skills. On "Day Two" of this three part series, learn how to make angled legs for simple sawhorses. (Sorry, I inserted the wrong video link when this post first went public. The correct "Day Two" video is linked now)

Carpenters Introduction to 3D Modelling

Carpenter's Introduction to 3D Modelling

Are you intimidated by 3D modelling? Get past your initial hesitation and frustration by beginning with some basics. Begin your 3D apprenticeship by building a hundred horses.

Deck Stair Layout 101

Deck Stair Layout 101

Deck stair layout is simple, right? Probably right, unless it's the first time you've tackled the task. With numerous "stair calculators" available, figuring rise and run dimensions is easy. Applying those dimensions is another matter. Watch this tutorial to see how to layout a basic set of deck stairs.

Exploring Octagonal Roof Framing with SketchUp

Exploring Octagonal Roof Framing with SketchUp

Octagonal roofs are always a focal point. Whether used as a unique architectural feature for a sun or breakfast room or an attractive gazebo, their unique shape draws attention. Explore this framing model to see components required to create this novel roof shape.

Is Your Future Sketchy?

Is Your Future Sketchy?

A New Year's resolution to learn how to use SketchUp for tackling project plans and design might be just the motivation needed to make your future a little less sketchy.

Free Visual Construction Calculator at The Digital Jobsite!

Free Visual Construction Calculator at The Digital Jobsite!

Quick! what's 137-13/16" divided by 11? What is 3-17/64" times 19? What is 1/7th of 51-9/16"? What is the volume of a cylinder 21-1/2" in diameter and 43-5/8" tall? Get your very own VISUAL CONSTRUCTION CALCULATOR by visiting The Digital Jobsite to find answers like these and many, many more!

A Tale of Two Pitches: Exploring Off-Angle Roof Framing

A Tale of Two Pitches: Exploring Off-Angle Roof Framing

Explore framing complexities that result when roofs of two different pitches intersect. A SketchUp model helps clarify how various rafters and framing components are assembled in an "off angle" hip and valley configuration.

Supersize Me: Working with Details in SketchUp

Supersize Me: Working with Details in SketchUp

The best way to work on small, detailed parts in SketchUp models it to Super-size them. This video shows how to eliminate frustration when drawing small, detailed parts.

Paint Scheme-ing with SketchUp

Paint Scheme-ing with SketchUp

What wall gets an accent color? Where should a contrasting stripe go? What color combination works best in a space? Use SketchUp for quick answers to these important questions before dipping a brush.

Arf, Arf! ??

Arf, Arf! ??

Dog days of summer prompt this whitetail deer to seek a cool, shady spot to oversee operations in my home shop.

Working Model: Quick Results from an Unrefined SketchUp Drawing

Working Model: Quick Results from an Unrefined SketchUp Drawing

This video series shows how an unrefined 3D SketchUp model will help get quick answers to design and dimension questions.

Small shop, productive results

Small shop, productive results

When it comes to tools and shops its not what you got but how you use it.

Chiroptophobics Beware

Chiroptophobics Beware

Chiroptophobia is a fear of bats. While I'm not afraid of bats, this video is just the sort of thing that could push me over the edge into becoming chiroptophobic... so beware!

Model and Measure: De-Mystifying Hip Roof Framing by Measuring in SketchUp

Model and Measure: De-Mystifying Hip Roof Framing by Measuring in SketchUp

Measuring a modeled hip roof is a foolproof way to measure all the rafters for a complete hip roof. This third of 3 parts shows the process to obtain perfect measurements for rafter layout.

Model & Measure: Hip Roof Framing De-Mystified by Modeling in SketchUp

Model & Measure: Hip Roof Framing De-Mystified by Modeling in SketchUp

Modeling hip roof framing components in the digital realm is comparable in complexity to cutting hip rafters on a jobsite. In either case, an understanding of roof geometry along with a handful of helpful hints makes for satisfying results. This tutorial will help de-mystify the process for modeling rafters with SketchUp

Model & Measure Part One: Hip Rafters De-mystified by Visualizing in SketchUp

Model & Measure Part One: Hip Rafters De-mystified by Visualizing in SketchUp

Visualizing the relatively complex geometry of a hip rafter can be difficult. Visualizing a hip rafter in a 3D SketchUp model is easy and confirms the old adage "a picture is worth a thousand words". This blog post is an attempt to demystify hip rafter geometry by visualizing it with SketchUp's digital capabilities.

Switch-Up to SketchUp: Going Digital With Design

Switch-Up to SketchUp: Going Digital With Design

If you want to take advantage of the many features offered by switching to a digital design format check out this tutorial for some insight into ways SketchUp can SpeedUp the process.

Medallion Magic: Design and Layout of Inlay Patterns

Medallion Magic: Design and Layout of Inlay Patterns

With an infinite number of design possibilities for inlay designs, consider this method for working through the planning process. Take advantage of the Rotate Tool at the Digital Jobsite to layout any configuration that comes to mind

Mud Math: Figuring Concrete Volume with SketchUp

Mud Math: Figuring Concrete Volume with SketchUp

When figuring concrete for bidding or pouring it's important to get a reliable volume amount. Use SketchUp to do your "mud math" for confident results when you call for that big white truck...

How to Calculate Rafters for Intersecting Roof Planes the Easy Way

How to Calculate Rafters for Intersecting Roof Planes the Easy Way

Using SketchUp as a visual calculator can simplify rafter layout for intersecting roof planes. While common rafter layout is fairly quick and straightforward using a framing square and construction calculator watch this video to see how easy it is to layout a non-typical rafter.

Locate Your Building on a Plot Plan with SketchUp

Locate Your Building on a Plot Plan with SketchUp

With the challenges of setbacks, easements, drainage planning, and other code compliance issues, it's important to get the location for a structure properly on the lot. Google's free 3-D modeling software has some features that make drawing a plot plan a snap.

Simplify Rafter-Pattern-Layout Math with Google SketchUp

Simplify Rafter-Pattern-Layout Math with Google SketchUp

SketchUp can be a useful option for layout and planning for cutting rafters. Check out this process for doing the math and see if it fits into your "bag-o-tricks" for carpentry or design projects.

How To Use SketchUps Photo Match Feature to Efficiently Design Remodeling Projects

How To Use SketchUp's "Photo Match" Feature to Efficiently Design Remodeling Projects

See how importing digital photos into SketchUp can jump-start the design process and aid bidding and selling your next built-in cabinet project.

Designers Touch: Create Light Fixtures for Your SketchUp Model

Designer's Touch: Create Light Fixtures for Your SketchUp Model

Sometimes a little bit of "bling" is just what a 3D model needs to get it from good to great. This post goes through steps to guide you through the process I use to create realistic, custom light fixture components to enhance models and impress clients.

Use SketchUp to Figure Crown Moulding Compound Miter Angles

Use SketchUp to Figure Crown Moulding Compound Miter Angles

In Quick and Slick: Crown Moulding with SketchUp I mentioned showing how to use SketchUp to figure in-depth information for specific crown moulding profiles. This session of The Digital Jobsite shows just that: import your crown profile with the Photo Match feature, extrude it (using methods from the Quick and Slick blog post) then calculate compound miter settings for any corner angle. Note: This is a rather complex, in-depth process, not for the faint of heart...

Cheat Sheet for SketchUp: a Quick-Start Guide for 3D Modeling

Cheat Sheet for SketchUp: a Quick-Start Guide for 3D Modeling

At first blush a digital 3D model can be intimidating and seem useless. With a little insight, however, a digital format offers some clear advantages over the tried and true models many of us have created over the years with nothing more than cardboard, tape and a utility knife. Watch the two video tutorials below for some insight into the advantages SketchUp has to offer...

How NOT to Wire a Garage Door Opener

How NOT to Wire a Garage Door Opener

Just when you think you've seen it all something like this comes along and... and you get a cramp in your neck from shaking your head... and wonder "WHAT" were they thinking?

Quick and Slick: Install Crown Molding the SketchUp Way

Quick and Slick: Install Crown Molding the SketchUp Way

Forget all the "cut upside-down and backwards" stuff you've learned about installing crown molding. On The Digital Job Site with SketchUp and the "Follow Me" tool even a novice can get perfect 3D installation every time!

Note to Self: Always Put Paint in Trunk!

Note to Self: Always Put Paint in Trunk!

How often to we head off to work without a concern of how tools, materials and supplies are loaded? For me its too often but these photos are a reminder to consider the consequences.

Hip to be Square: Pythagoras in the Digital Age

Hip to be Square: Pythagoras in the Digital Age

Considering all the whiz-bang capabilities SketchUp has to offer, it's easy to overlook how helpful it can be for basic tasks. This episode shows how to calculate accurate (extremely precise, actually) square-up dimensions for any type of layout work with the "Cliculator".

Steps in the Right Direction:  Use SketchUps Tools for Stairbuilding Plans

Steps in the Right Direction: Use SketchUp's Tools for Stairbuilding Plans

The staircase model created in the Stairmathter blog post gets filled in with more details and components to calculate meaningful dimensions for code compliance and finish features

Stairmathter: Use SketchUp to Master the Math for Stairbuilding

Stairmathter: Use SketchUp to Master the Math for Stairbuilding

Create a digital layout using jobsite dimensions and let SketchUp do the math to calculate cutting dimensions and angles for stair stringers accounting for finish floor thicknesses and other pertinent information.

Digitile: Use a SketchUp Model to Layout, Estimate, and Build a Takeoff List for a Tiling-Job

Digitile: Use a SketchUp Model to Layout, Estimate, and Build a Takeoff List for a Tiling-Job

No, digitile is not a typo for digital, its just my (lame?) title for using digital tools to layout, plan, and quantity of materials for a recent floor tile project. Here I give a brief overview of the process I used... see what you think.

Fencing Lessons... Designing a Picket Fence with SketchUp

Fencing Lessons... Designing a Picket Fence with SketchUp

Thinking of building a new fence once the ground thaws? Get a head start on the project by working out the design with a SketchUp model by using some of the drawing methods from this 3-part video tutorial.

Ill Fly if Youll Buy

I'll Fly if You'll Buy

It's breaktime, you're hot, you're tired and the call for beverages goes out. Looks like they sent the wrong guy this time!

Designing Patricks Barn: Adding Window Components

Designing Patrick's Barn: Adding Window Components

With the roof configuration approved, the next step is to create a window component to add to the studio model. Using Silverline brand window schematic dimension as a guide, a realistic window model is created. This provides an opportunity to decide what, where and how many windows to use.

Bridge Over Trouble

Bridge Over Trouble

Everything seems normal enough on this bridge construction site until...

From Cardboard and Cutter to Click and Drag:  Studio/Workshop Design in the Digital Age

From Cardboard and Cutter to Click and Drag: Studio/Workshop Design in the Digital Age

If there was ever a project to demonstrate the usefulness and versatility of SketchUp, it is Pat's Studio/Workshop design process. Follow along and learn ways to work through design issues on that project you have been putting off for so long...

Window of Opportunity: Using SketchUps Component Warehouse

Window of Opportunity: Using SketchUp's Component Warehouse

Learn how simple and useful it is to take advantage of a vast selection of components available free online to enhance your SketchUp model.

Truss Bracing?  We Dont Need No Stinking Truss Bracing!!!

Truss Bracing? We Don't Need No Stinking Truss Bracing!!!

Truss Failure Recipe: Take one truss package, and install hastily on Friday; add one weekend, and whip with high winds; Serve up to builder's risk insurance company

How to Repair a Roof Flashing Boot (in a Flash)

How to Repair a Roof Flashing Boot (in a Flash)

Here's a quick and trouble free way to repair a vent pipe roof flashing when the rubber seal part has failed from UV damage. Sure beats tearing out the whole flashing!

Jambing with SketchUp: Create and Add an Exterior Door Component

Jambing with SketchUp: Create and Add an Exterior Door Component

This Digital Jobsite session shows some ideas for using an "outline" method and SketchUp's "follow me" tool to create profiled millwork in an exterior door component for the shed model.

Ch-Ch-Ch-Changes: Adding a Door Opening

Ch-Ch-Ch-Changes: Adding a Door Opening

These two video clips demonstrate how simple it is to make changes to an existing SketchUp model with the help of the Section Plane tool.

The Rafter Youre After: Using SketchUp to Draw Roof Framing

The Rafter You're After: Using SketchUp to Draw Roof Framing

This series of video clips demonstrates techniques to lay out and draw common rafters using a "layout plane" method to simplify the process.

Use SketchUp to create a 3D framing model

Use SketchUp to create a 3D framing model

These short video clips show how you can quickly create a 3D model of a simple framed structure. See how to use some basic SketchUp functions and features to plan a project.

Light in the Tunnel: A Moldy Crawlspace Nightmare Part 4

Light in the Tunnel: A Moldy Crawlspace Nightmare Part 4

Like waking up from a nightmare, there is relief in wrapping up this rebuilding project.

A Moldy Crawlspace Nightmare Part 3:  The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

A Moldy Crawlspace Nightmare Part 3: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

The part of the Crawlspace Nightmare that I wish wasn't real after waking up.

After Shock: A Moldy Crawlspace Nightmare Part 2

After Shock: A Moldy Crawlspace Nightmare Part 2

After the initial shock of finding so much deterioration of the wood in this crawlspace, its time to plan repairs.

SketchUp for Builders and Remodelers: Build a Virtual Lumber Yard

SketchUp for Builders and Remodelers: Build a Virtual Lumber Yard

Remodeler Matt Jackson introduces SketchUp — the easy-to-use free 3D drawing software from Google — as a great tool for planning and selling small construction projects.

A Moldy Crawlspace Nightmare

A Moldy Crawlspace Nightmare

I admit I was caught off guard on this one.  Usually I can tell when I'm about to open up a proverbial can of worms, but not this time.  My current client asked me simply enough to...



Recent comments


Re: Locate Your Building on a Plot Plan with SketchUp


Hi user-3710855,
I'm not aware of an update for the plugin used for this tutorial. I haven't had need to do any of this type work for some time so didn't know it's apparently no longer working.

I would be surprised, however, if there isn't something out there for this useful function. There are so many plugins out there with more being created constantly it seems there should be something available.
You could contact Matt Donley of MasterSketchup.com who I find to be very knowledgeable and well-connected with everything SketchUp related. If he doesn't know I'm sure he'll know someone who does. For what it's worth you can tell him I sent you...

Regards,

Matt Jackson

Re: Wood Floor Art: Sun Dog

OuradaDesigns,
Fascinating technique for flooring!

Can you share a little about the subfloor required, fastening method and durability of these over time?

PS This is eye-catching flooring artwork like I've never seen! I'll bet that if you re-arrange your photos so that one showing the finished product is first you'll get a lot more traffic to your post. Just sayin'...

Re: Internet of Things & Smart Cities Offer Intriguing Prospects

WWWHHHAAATTT???

Re: Safe Stairway to Above-Garage Storage

Lawrence,
A unique solution to a common problem... nicely done! I'll have to keep your ouside-the-box idea in mind for future projects. I turned down a project last year because a conventional attic stair wouldn't work in a particular application but your idea would have been perfect. Maybe I'll just give those folks a call back...

Have you considered posting your photo on Pinterest? My guess it would get a lot of buzz there.

Re: Exploring Octagonal Roof Framing with SketchUp

Highriseman,

Glad to hear you liked the video. Modeling somewhat unusual or unconventional things in SketchUp is a rewarding challenge. I wish you well in your modelling efforts!

Just a search for a plugin for "point at center" or "arc centerpoint" and pick one that sounds like it will work. I originally found one that had a "point at center" option in a dropdown list but lost the plugin while upgrading my computer. The plugin I currently use has the "arc centerpoint" option in a dropdown list but who knows if it's still available. My guess is you'll easily find something to your liking that's currently available... and if you do, maybe you'd share it here for other viewers?

I find myself using the center point feature invaluable in modeling anything with circles or arcs. One thing to keep in mind: the center point seems to get disabled if a circle or arc is "exploded" or altered while drawing so I try to remember to add the center point before any altering operations.

Re: How to Repair a Roof Flashing Boot (in a Flash)

roofdonkey,

There is certainly wisdom from experience in your thorough comment which would be difficult to argue against.

From a quality standpoint I completely agree with your points. When I see roofs that are replaced in 10~12 years from getting thrashed in our violent hailstorms, a 20~30 year flashing is less of a necessity. Sad state of affairs to be sure. I'll be you share the same frustration as I do when I see an expensive, 40 year product, like granite countertops or cast iron bathtub, ripped out and sent to a landfill after 12 years just because someone has tired of its appearance.

With all your years in the roofing industry, I sure wish you lived where I do as there's a serious lack in quality roofing contractors here.

Work safe on those roofs, my friend.

Matt

Re: A Tale of Two Pitches: Exploring Off-Angle Roof Framing

Hey Mr J,

Truer words are seldom spoken than the quote in your most recent comment: "There is more to these roofs than "meets the eye"." Ironically, in this case the teacher (me?), learns a lesson in the process of teaching. The subtle though important issues about hip/valley placement that you've highlighted in our ongoing dialog on the Tale of Two Pitches saga have inspired me to follow your suggestion to do a follow up post showing the "offset method" of framing an off-angle hip roof system.

Since I've personally not framed this type of roof using the offset method it may take awhile to put the Digital Jobsite Blog post together. I love a new challenge and learning experience so I'll be working on the SketchUp model first. Once completed I'll upload the model to the Component Warehouse for feedback. Hopefully by that time I'll have learned enough about the process to post a viable follow up. I see a problem on the horizon though: what to title the new post? "A Tale of Three Pitches" sounds too much like a baseball game... HHMMMM...

Thanks for your valuable input and feedback on a topic you're obviously invested in.

Regards,

Matt Jackson

Re: A Tale of Two Pitches: Exploring Off-Angle Roof Framing

Mr Jalapeno,

Progress slow but sure...

Just wanted to let you know that I've re-worked the roof model for this blog post and uploaded it to the Component Warehouse. I fixed the fascia position by "re-cutting" rafters to make the roof planes line up. I left the H/V rafters in the "centered" orientation and show beveled tops so roof planes line up correctly.

Since the "offset" H/V method you've explained (very clearly) is new to me, I've got to spend a little time figuring out how best to model and then explain the process. Viewers who look closely at the (newly revised) Off-Angle Roof model will notice complex angle/bevel cuts necessary when the H/V rafters are centered. To clarify the offset H/V method I'll "build" and upload an additional off-angle roof model to compare the similarities and differences between the two methods discussed here.

Thanks Mr J. and who've participated in this discussion so far... something tells me its not over yet :-)

Matt

Re: Hardware Geek - Accurate Pocket Door Hardware Review

Matt,

Hardware for pocket doors has always been the weak link, IMHO. It doesn't seem to matter how classy the door itself may be, the hardware always makes them look hinky. Thanks for sharing this info; I hope I can convince clients that the extra cost is money well spent.

I can't tell for sure from the photos or hardware links: is this hardware available for 1 3/8" thick doors? I assume from the pictures of an interior door that they would be 1 3/8" thick but they kind of look thicker.

Regards,

Matt Jackson

Re: A Tale of Two Pitches: Exploring Off-Angle Roof Framing

Mr Jalapeno,

I understand your explanation of the process for locating the offset hip/valley footprint. I can't see how or why the offset is necessary though. Can you explain further? It seems that, for a carpenter assembling the rafters, it's more straightforward to adjust the jack rafter lengths and geometry to center the H/V than to work in a very small offset dimension (1 1/32" and 15/32" in this example). Does centering the H/V warp the roof planes or some other subtle distortion?

Not including fascia thickness in the overhang dimension in the Tale of Two Pitches model was something I realized late in the modeling process. I should have adjusted things at the time as now you've nearly convinced me I should re-work the model. Do you happen to have a good recipe for humble pie? It's looking like I'm going to have to eat a slice or two :-)

Looking forward to your response...

Matt

Re: A Tale of Two Pitches: Exploring Off-Angle Roof Framing

Mr Jalapeno,
Thanks for being so observant of details in this post and its model.

I'm not exactly sure what the point of your first comment is. The hip/valley members are 1 1/2" thick and my intent was to show the bottom surface of roof sheathing meeting at their centers. If you're saying they should be off-center please explain.

Your observation is correct about the H/V line meeting the inside corner of the fascia instead of the outside. You are correct. Measure the offset in SU and you'll see it is less than 1/2". From a modeling standpoint it should be corrected. Even with perfect math, in a framing situation an error of that size could be the result of nominal framing lumber variance, crowns in rafters, etc. The roof framer would need to use his quality conscience to decide what, if anything, should be done to correct it. I've long lived by the credo: "If it takes a little work to make something a lot better, it's worth it. If it takes a lot of work to make something a little better, it's probably not worth it." This seems to be an ideal application of the principal.

The idea of showing bevels on top of the ridges is to help visualize how the roof planes "plane out" with aid of the "Z flashing" effect in SkectchUp. If I do a "Part III" as you suggest I can address this to help eliminate confusion.

I appreciate your input on this topic. Your depth of knowledge and insight will benefit any who invest a little time to read our dialog.

Thanks,
Matt


Re: Wall Layout and Framing Basics for Simple Shed Project

Inspectpro,
While my intent was to show efficient use of materials I sometimes wonder if I achieved it. From your post it sounds like I did.
Thanks!

Re: Hidden Giant Medicine Cabinet

Matt,
I'm amazed that just 3 hinges on each mirror/door are adequate considering the weight of mirror glass and oak frame. Those must be pretty beefy hinges!
Nice work in providing the architect what he designed.

Matt

Re: Temporary Support Beams for Sill and Foundation Work

Mike,

Replacing support framing is always a challenging task. However, as your blog post shows, it is possible. It's good that you include photos along with drawings to show theory in practice.

I got into related work as shown and described here:

http://www.finehomebuilding.com/item/12351/light-in-the-tunnel-a-moldy-crawlspace-nightmare-part-4

Both cases show that with a plan and some hard work new life can be built back into old and failed structures.

Re: How to Make Spray-Can Caps Easier to Remove and Replace

Simple solutions are best! Thanks guys!

Re: Wall Layout and Framing Basics for Simple Shed Project

Paul,

Glad to hear you're finding this series helpful. A busy summer has stalled my blog post schedule but I have full intentions of continuing the series to complete the shed.

Thanks for your patience!

Re: Fireplace

Cuffe,
Very unique design and nicely done. What are the blocks made of?

Re: Piano converison

Give a whole new meaning to the term "playing with fire" :-)

Re: Wall Layout and Framing Basics for Simple Shed Project

Dreamcatcher,
Thanks! Great instruction to any and all who want to learn efficient and effective SketchUp Modeling.

Carver; the thought processes explained in Dreamcatcher's comment are well worth studying to overcome the modeling challenges you asked about. You won't go wrong applying his insight and methods to take your modeling up a notch. I've learned a thing or two from DC's comments as I'm sure others have.

I don't remember if it's pointed out in the videos but the shed window is one of the Marvin "Dynamic Components" DC mentions. They're a great asset to the SketchUp modeling community and just plain old cool to work with.

Re: Begin With the End in Mind: Shed Layout and Floor Framing

Araltan_Mandzhiev,
From your previous comment I noticed that some of the 2x4 plates did indeed overlap at the corners. It was an oversight in building the model so thanks for pointing it out. I "fixed" the plate lengths in the current model in the 3D Warehouse so they are now as they should be: 2 through walls, 2 butt walls as you correctly state.
Even The Digital Jobsite needs an inspector now and again :-) so let me know anytime something is amiss.

Re: Stonescape Fireplace

Brian,
Hey, that looks great! Bet that's not the last one of THOSE that you do...

Matt
The Digital Jobsite Blog at Fine Homebuilding.com

Re: Stonescape Fireplace

Brian,
Hey, that looks great! Bet that's not the last one of THOSE that you do...

Matt
The Digital Jobsite Blog at Fine Homebuilding.com

Re: A 3D Apprenticeship: Day Two

hull187,
Yes, there is a way to find the cut angle for the sawhorse legs with 3 mouse clicks. In fact, its one of the great advantages of using SketchUp to model a project before building it. Whether a simple set of sawhorses or a complex framing assembly, all the information is built into the model where you can design, measure and count every feature ahead of time. Sorry, got carried away there... sounds like I'm trying to sell SketchUp or something :-)

Use the Protractor tool to find the cut angle. Select the tool and "index" it to the 1 1/2" face of a leg, then slide it until the center of the tool aligns with the long point of the leg angle cut at the bottom of the leg. Once the center of the Protractor turns to a purple dot, left click to lock it to that point. Next move your mouse to swing the dotted line to a vertical position which is indicated when the dotted line turns from black to blue. With the blue line showing click again to lock the start position for your angle measurement. Lastly, swing the dotted line (it will switch back to black when you start moving it) to the same edge of the leg that the center point is set on until a second purple dot appears. The degrees of swing from the vertical start point to the leg angle will show up in the Value Control Box in the lower right corner of your screen.

Once you get familiar with this sequence of 3 clicks it should take literally 3 seconds to measure any angle although it can be a bit frustrating starting out because the tool seems to jump about disobediently.

The angle in the sawhorse model as uploaded to the Component Warehouse shows +/- 15.9 degrees.

A few things to keep in mind:
Use the Protractor tool NOT the Rotate tool.
You can measure the complimentary angle from horizontal by using a green axis oriented dotted line to start the 2nd click
When the Protractor tool wants to jump around to any face but the one you want to index on, first hover the tool over the face you want and then hold down the Shift key. That will keep your desired orientation no matter where you move the tool.

Guess that ended up as a $50 answer to a $5 question but I hope it helps!
Have fun modeling and building...

Matt
aka The Timber Tailor

Re: Wall Layout and Framing Basics for Simple Shed Project

carver,
For your question about using components:
My approach to using components has evolved over time. Early on I spent (wasted?) a lot of time creating components of just about everything. More recently I've found that using Groups allows all of the benefits of Components with less effort. Either one will help minimize the "extraneous lines" you're finding as long as you pay close attention to whether you're in or or out of Group/Component Edit mode.
I suggest making each separate piece of a model a Group which you can Move/Copy to replicate. Create Components only when you anticipate the potential need for future batch-editing. Remember you can always Explode either a Group or Component and then switch its attributes to the other one if you find you wished you'd made it the other one.
I think in the first SU Blog shed I made a lot more components of studs, cripples, etc. In this new shed most of that stuff is just grouped so I guess I'm saying Components would work for for modifying the wall framing for the door and window but I don't think its worth the extra trouble.
Thanks for giving me a pass on the cursor movement. I hope I'm actually getting better but there is the danger that you're just becoming hypnotized by it and just THINK it's better :-)

Matt

Re: After Shock: A Moldy Crawlspace Nightmare Part 2

turner,
It's obvious that we BOTH know how unpleasant fixing this sort of problem can be! You describe consequences of extremely wet soil and some excellent steps to solve problems. Part of what was surprising on the project I was involved with was how much damage accumulated even with very DRY soil conditions. Just goes to show how harmful moisture and improper construction methods can be! I hope your customer appreciated the work you did to fix an ugly problem... pumping in a slab? Ugh! Bet you won't forget that one for awhile!

Matt Jackson
aka The Timber Tailor
The Digital Jobsite Blog

Re: Can We Get Smarter About Job-Site Communication?

Vera,

I think much of this is already figured out, it's just that the solution is difficult to attain.
A knowledgeable, conscientious, accountable and responsible project manager acting as the central "hub" for the flow of information is what it takes for successful project completion. To somehow "systematize" this person's function is what you appear to be after. On small scale projects it's impractical to put in enough levels of management, oversight, assessment, evaluation, etc to circumvent the need for the one central person that is responsible for just getting things done.
This paragraph from above:

"Once the day or week is over, any work that doesn't go as planned is analyzed for the underlying reason, in order to correct the condition on future work. The goal is to increase the predictability of the work."

highlights the gulf between how people accomplish things on a jobsite and the type of "system" it would take for similar results.

The core difficulty in attaining efficient, effective project management with the ever increasing complex flow of jobsite information is finding and retaining the caliber of person for the job. Any new ideas developed in your quest are most welcome as the type of individual qualified for project management seem to be increasingly rare.

Matt Jackson
The Digital Jobsite

Re: Will 3D Printers Replace Homebuilders?

This 3D house printer is a highly advanced piece of computerized machinery. Simply press the start button and stand back to watch as a brand new house is printed before your very eyes. With cutting edge CAD/CAM software to run the entire system, you can rest assured that nothing will go wrong %^$...will go wrong %^$...will go wrong %^$...will go wrong %^$...will go wrong %^$...will go wrong %^$.....will go wrong %^$...will go wrong %^$...will go wrong %^$...will go wrong %^$....will go wrong %^$...

:-) Matt Jackson
Ironically, from The Digital Jobsite (of all places)

Re: Begin With the End in Mind: Shed Layout and Floor Framing

user-2404946,
I re-uploaded the shed model so it should now include the nails you mention. The nails in the model are just a 3 1/2" line with a 5/16" circle attached to it to represent nails. I made accurate 16cc sinkers with countersunk heads, chiseled points, grip rings and waffled heads but all that extra geometry really slows down model manipulating speed making it cumbersome to draw. If you're interested, I uploaded the 16cc sinker model to the Warehouse too. You can find it at:

http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/details?mid=427cfe21bc59eba063dfa538ac47623b

I'll try to remember to re-upload the current version after each successive progress tutorial to keep it complete.

I'm not sure what you're referring to about walls overlapping at the corners. I'll cover wall framing in the next tutorial which might help understand how the walls intersect at the corners with one running past the other for connection strength.

Thanks for watching this tutorial and commenting... hope it helps with your shed modeling and planning.

Re: The True Tale of a One-Tree House

Mike,
What a wonderful and engaging tale of a charming structure. Nice all around.

Matt

Re: Begin With the End in Mind: Shed Layout and Floor Framing

Shamisen,
The nails used to fasten each joist to a layout mark are permanent.
Its important to straighten out each joist to a measured mark as shown @14:00 to make sure they are all straight when nailing is done. Make sure the first joist is aligned to the end of the sheet of plywood and nail it. Since the long edge of the plywood is straight and holding the framing straight, attaching that first joist flush with the end guarantees its straight and square. Measuring the other joists from the first one thats straight and square assures that they are "on layout" as well. If you are screwing the plywood down and don't want ANY nails in it then you could "tack" the end joist, measure and "tack" intermediate joists in place, screw everything down and then remove the nails you used to temporarily "tack" things in place.
Make sense?
Keep me posted on your progress and let me know if there's anything you'd like to see addressed in the next blog segment. (I'll probably put it together over the weekend of 13/14 April)

Re: Begin With the End in Mind: Shed Layout and Floor Framing

Shamisen,
Good question:
I chose to show the 4x4's even with the floor framing to make it easier to enclose the space beneath the shed to keep critters out. Moving them in 12" or so from either side would make the floor stiffer by reducing the span of the floor joists by 2', which is fine, but would make it difficult to enclose the space under the shed. If I was going to put really heavy stuff in the shed and wanted a stiffer floor I would just add a 3rd 4x4 right in the middle.
I can add these features to the shed model in the next post if it would help you understand the variables here.

Matt

Re: Is Your Future Sketchy?

AdCherry,

I don't know of a way to post photos into comments here but it should work to put them here:

http://www.finehomebuilding.com/share/gallery/28480?contest=66

Assuming that works, lets move this conversation over to the Octagonal Framing blog post. Just put a comment at this link:

http://www.finehomebuilding.com/item/26675/exploring-octagonal-roof-framing-with-sketchup

after you upload photos to the gallery.

I'm anxious to see your gazeebo project take shape.

Matt

Re: Laser-Guided Sonic Stop Makes Measuring Miter-Saw Cuts a Breeze

Thanks for the tool tip, Cluck! errr, I mean Chuck.

Sonic Stop is guaranteed to make you trim work look finger lickin' good!

Re: His and Hers Garden Shed

Gives a whole other meaning to the term "can lights"! Very clever.

Re: Excavators Getting Their Groove On

and the title of this number is....

dirt-y dancing

Re: Patrick's Barn: Heat, Light, and Internet

Pat,
Do you have plans for circulating air from the woodstove alcove? A fan or grille to an adjacent room would probably work wonders in evening out heat distribution. Seems like the heat will migrate upstairs and minimize how much you'd need to supplement with the baseboard resistance, especially if you can incorporate a floor grille upstairs somewhere to encourage air circulation by convection. I doubt I'm telling you anything you haven't already considered here.

And there's always the fringe benefit of having a woodstove in proximity to a woodshop: evidence of mistakes while woodworking quickly vanishes in the column of smoke... I'll never tell how I learned that one :-)

Matt

Re: Senate bill would ease EPA paint rule

I agree: "reasonable level of training" being the main point.
The current level of training and procedures is beyond reasonable IMHO.
Renovators may have more than a reasonable level of knowledge of dangers of cigarette smoke which clearly has equal, if not greater, hazardous effect than potential lead paint exposure. Does that mean the EPA should require contractors to monitor exposure of their customers and families to cigarette smoke as well? Seriously.

Re: A 3D Apprenticeship: Day Two

Carver,
I know what you mean about the crazy cursor jittering and keyboard sounds! And I say "uhhmm" a lot too. I make a conscious effort to minimize unconscious habits while recording the tutorials but still need a lot of improvement. The inexpensive starter microphone I purchased for blogging is proving inadequate for the task and needs to be upgraded. I think a better mic would filter out annoying background noises.
Rest assured that improving the production quality of The Digital Jobsite Blog videos is a high priority for me. I've mastered many areas of carpentry, contracting and modeling with SketchUp but producing and publishing online content is a whole other thing!
For ongoing improvement I just upgraded to a smokin' new Win7 PC and a Space Mouse Pro 3D mouse. Next on the list is better screen capture video software and better mic. Guess all I'll need then is a production manager/editor/coach to polish my presentation poise.
In the meantime I'll try to keep the topics, pace and depth of tutorials rich enough to warrant um, putting up with, umm, the nervous tics and uh, uh, uh... noises :-)

Matt

Re: Working Model: Quick Results from an Unrefined SketchUp Drawing

Robaar01,

I appreciate that you are a Fine Homebuilding member but it's quite beyond me what razor wire has to do with SketchUp or The Digital Jobsite. Any way you can re-post your comment where it's relevent?

Matt

Re: Senate bill would ease EPA paint rule

Let's hope this bill passes to bring some sensibility back to the remodeling industry.

Re: Helping Hen

Too funny! A most original pair of mascots...

Re: Is Your Future Sketchy?

Adam of Perth,

Its good to hear that Exploring Octagonal Roof Framing with SketchUp was helpful for your current project. As you and StLHandyMan clearly explain, those of us who need to present our ideas to help "sell" them quickly realize the many benefits SketchUp has to offer.

Since I focused on rafters, not timbers, to frame the octagon roof in the tutorial I trust you'll be able to adapt using a Point at Center combined with Rotate/Copy to model timbers for your gazeebo project. These methods would work well for various posts, panels and "gingerbread" components for the support structure as well. It sounds like an interesting project. If you happen to get stuck on any aspect of modelling it just post comments and I'd try to help.

BTW a great tutorial on additional ways to share SU models with prospective clients is here:

http://www.mastersketchup.com/sharing-your-model-remotely-live/

where Matt Donley shows a number of very effective ways to present design ideas to clients. My personal favorite is the "join.me" method which consistently "wows" clients. I take them on a virtual tour of their project visualizing various features to make design choices at a time when changes are easily made with mouse clicks rather than crowbars. As an excellent resource for many other aspects, features and history of SU, I've subscribed to MasterSkethUp.com to stay current on SU related topics.

Thanks for you input,

Matt

Re: Balcony / Library Ladder that can be stored in a horizontal position.

Jerry,
Your ladder is both graceful and functional... nicely done!

BTW Jerry's shop was recently featured on the WoodWeb site. Seeing his shop makes it no surprise to me he turns out this caliber of work.

Matt Jackson
The Digital Jobsite blog at finehomebuilding.com

Re: Exploring Octagonal Roof Framing with SketchUp

ecdunn,

The rafter assembly method you describe is probably more common than the way shown in the model for this post. I considered drawing the model without the central "ridge" block but decided it was more straightforward with the block. I see it as a matter of carpenter preference; a choice between making a faceted ridge or the sharp angled plumb cuts. With the shear number of intersecting rafters, thoughtful nail placement is involved either way.

BTW I have a model for circular roof framing in the works and use spaced blocking as you explain; to reduce the mass of wood at the peak.

Your comments add to the value of the discussion here and are appreciated.

Matt

Re: A Tale of Two Pitches: Exploring Off-Angle Roof Framing

slstamand,

I respect your persistence. It brings to light more of the geometric constraints of roof framing. It also helped me to understand the point you raise: Soffit width and fascia height can be made equal by adjusting the roof pitch and rafter bearing height.
If there is viewer interest I will draw and upload a roof framing model to clarify how wall and rafter framing would be configured to meet this design criteria. I agree it would be a great resource for the learning process.

Thanks for sharing at The Digital Jobsite.

Matt

Re: Self-Taught MBA: Getting Intimate with Social Marketing

Fernando,

Thanks for the overview of Linkedin. I've steered away from social media for the most part to avoid the "tweeny" stigma I perceive of it. I'll have to reconsider based on your description of its usefulness.

Re: Breaking Ground with my dog, and CAT

Nice to see that your pets get along so well! Just don't get their food mixed up :-)

Re: combine power cords and dust pickup hoses on sanders. planers, saws etc.

Simple and effective. Way to go!

Re: Hidden Doors, Secret Rooms, and the Hardware that makes it possible!

Matt,
I remember your initial post about the hidden doors... its good to see you've found a niche doing such cool projects! Thanks for the link on the St Louis Designs heavy duty touch latches, I've needed similar hardware a number of times and always came up short at the hardware store.

Nice work,

Matt

Re: A Tale of Two Pitches: Exploring Off-Angle Roof Framing

slstamand,

Thanks for your comments...

While raising wall heights can indeed make the fascia line up, all other things being equal, it would make the ridge heights differ by the same amount. Its a matter of choosing where to compromise in a selection of geometric constraints.

I hope you find The Digital Jobsite and SketchUp helpful in visualizing non-standard roof framing configurations.

Matt

Re: Digital Toolbox: Getting an Education Without Leaving the Job Site

Fernando,
Thanks for sharing some great info and resources in this post..
I just bookmarked the toolsofthetrade.net website link for future reference.

Re: Supersize Me: Working with Details in SketchUp

Dreamcatcher,

Your comments are much appreciated... I learn new things each time you post here!

And thanks for sharing valuable insight from the archaic world of AutoCAD (a program I personally have never used)for the benefit of SU converts. It seems as if there is a chasm of complexity between the two programs that would be more difficult to cross without perspective from those who have already crossed it.

Matt

Re: A Tale of Two Pitches: Exploring Off-Angle Roof Framing

Dreamcatcher,

Thanks for "stopping by" the Digital Jobsite. Your in-depth and wide ranging experience from work and business along with extensive knowledge of SketchUp is always an asset to the discussion here.

As there are as many ways to model things as there are to build them I hope other viewers appreciate the methods and perspective shared in your comments,I know I do.

Matt

Re: Supersize Me: Working with Details in SketchUp

pjenk,

If I understand your question/comment there's good news:
The "graying out" you are asking about is an inherent function of working on any geometry in SketchUp that is in a Group or Component; no special command is necessary.

Starting with a blank screen, draw a box. Now stack another box on top of it. Any editing you do to any of this geometry at this point won't "gray-out" anything else on the screen. Next, select either the first or second box by dragging a box around it with the cursor. Right click on the selected box and choose "Make Group" from the drop down list. With that done, double-click on the box Group you just created which gets you into "Group Edit" mode which will grey out everything on screen outside the Grouped geometry; no special command lines or command sequence necessary.

Welcome to the intuitive simplicity of SketchUp!

Hope that helps... if not I'll try again.

Matt


Re: Supersize Me: Working with Details in SketchUp

TomLev,
Thanks for a heads up on that dead link; I didn't notice that it wasn't working when I published the blog post. Some sort of glitch with the code imbed process but I think I've got it fixed.

Matt

Re: Generations

Richard,

Touching anecdote which nicely weaves life and work together. I hope your daughter appreciates it in a meaningful way. It's tougher to glue generations together than it is lumber.

An aside: Some viewers may be unfamiliar with the very useful angle divider shown in your photo. There are few times that I use the one I've had for over 30 years but for specific tasks, stairs in particular, it's irreplaceable. With all the wiz-bang new gadgets out there it is good to see tried-and-true tools and methods still being used. With a little luck your story will help preserve this too.

If anyone has further interest in angle dividers, I uploaded an accurate full scale 3D model of a General No. 835 in the SketchUp Component Warehouse where it can be downloaded and examined.

Matt Jackson
The Digital Jobsite blog

Re: Recessed Retrofit Led Trim Kit

SmartbuildingGrp,
I don't know about the brand you show above but I recently bought a very comparable unit in the Sylvania brand, also at Lowe's at a similar price point. It has very similar specs to what you describe above. I installed 2 in two 4" IC rated can light units and another one in a 6" can and am extremely pleased with the results. I'm no engineer but it stands to reason that going from 65 watts down to 13 watts should result in a similar percentage drop in heat output. (if an engineer does read this, let me know if my figgerin' is wrong). I sealed the bezel to the ceiling with a thin foam ring on the back side which should minimize if not eliminate air migration around it.
I really like that the light comes on "full strength" right away instead of "warming up" like a compact fluorescent and at 3,500 lumens is a nice "color" of light and quite bright. The ones I got claim to be dimmable down to 20% and are suitable for damp locations. The only negative, and its very minor, is that it takes about a half second from when I flip the light switch until the light goes on. Must have something to do with the way the LED "module" on the back of the unit functions. Some designers might have issue with the plain appearance of the trim bezel too.
All in all I'd highly recommend making the switch for heat, near zero maintenance and operating cost reasons.

Hope this helps.

Re: Installing a Wireless Switch

Cool stuff, Mike. Thanks for sharing this... I've just added it to my bag-o-tricks to use as soon as the opportunity arises.

Matt

Re: "Many hands make work light."

Mike,


"If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants."
Isaac Newton (1642 - 1727), Letter to Robert Hooke, February 5, 1675

Its great to give tribute to the mentors in our lives! None of the ones I learned from had any type of degree or diploma to adorn their "atta-boy" walls. Come to think of it, none of them had any real wall to adorn in the first place. Their credentials were the "been there, done that" type which were mainly displayed verbally with jobsite banter. This makes me a firm believer in the hands-on approach to learning; "see one, do one, teach one" is hard to beat.

The most memorable building mentor on my resume would have to be Pat Morrisroe. Pat, a stocky, energetic Irishman ran his framing crew with a homespun motivation. He showed by example how to work hard and efficiently, teaching us that to do so required "getting a system" for each of the various tasks involved in framing custom residential homes in the early '80's. One guy on the crew who knew Pat for years used to say "I've never seen a guy who is so consistently right" when talking about Pat's performance as job foreman. I'd have to agree.
Applying many of the methods and lessons learned in the 4 years I worked for Morrisroe Construction made a positive impact my carpentry career, especially once I set my own course in the high-end residential remodeling field. It feels as if I've benefitted from standing on the shoulders of a giant, although Pat might argue the point.

Matt Jackson
The Timber Tailor

Re: Find Your Niche and Own It

Fernando,
Interesting topic to ponder.
Regardless of the type of work, I find the best niche is excellent customer service. Keeping clients informed and happy maintains a steady flow of work for my business while not restricting the type of work I do. From custom design, millwork, stairs and framing its nice to have a variety of work to keep it interesting while confined to a narrow niche of satisfied clients.
Looking forward to future segments on this topic.

Re: Glass – It’s Not Just for Windows Anymore!

Ken,

The glass certainly gives a remarkable look to this kitchen. Nice work!

I'm curious about lead times for design/fabrication/installation as well as approximate sq ft costs. Looks like the sort of thing I'd like to offer to clients.

Are there some special transparent titanium fasteners available for screwing these tops to the cabinets? Wouldn't want one to slide off and crash to the floor <:-P

Re: Working Model: Quick Results from an Unrefined SketchUp Drawing

Mr Nailer,

Sounds like you've replaced error-prone pencil sketches with digital modeling as well. In this and other ways the "good 'ol days" weren't so good after all.

I've heard about the cutlist ruby a number of times in different places but have yet to try it myself. If you care to share a bit more about it I would appreciate it. I think other viewers would as well.

Thanks for stopping by The Digital Jobsite and taking the time to comment.

Re: Model and Measure: De-Mystifying Hip Roof Framing by Measuring in SketchUp

raineysky,

I'm giving your "series" idea some thought.
Would you give me some details about the type of structure you have in mind? You mentioned the man cave on a slab, but what about roof type (gable, hip, other?) approximate size, type of exterior finish (siding, EIFS, brick, other?) types of doors and windows etc?.
My thought is that the tutorial series could go through various stages in an attempt to show the whole process and it might as well be fairly close to the building you are thinking about.
Thanks again for your interest... we'll see what materializes.

Re: A Whimsical Fresh-air Shower

Excellent choice of materials for a functional, attractive outdoor shower... nice work!

Re: Model and Measure: De-Mystifying Hip Roof Framing by Measuring in SketchUp

Paul,

I'll see what I can do.

Assuming you've watched the early posts at The Digital Jobsite (from 2010) that cover "building" a small shed in broad strokes, do you have some specific points that are troublesome?

A complete structure gets into architectural/engineering territory with potential code, structural and safety issues where I hesitate to tread but it might be feasible to cover it in some fashion. Hit me up with some feedback to see if we can put legs on this idea.

Thanks for watching,

Matt

Re: Model and Measure: De-Mystifying Hip Roof Framing by Measuring in SketchUp

raineysky,

It's good to hear you like the posts. And thanks for taking a moment to comment.

BTW, I'm always looking for new topic ideas to cover so feel free to offer suggestions for things you would find helpful and useful. Chances are, if it's something you have an interest in other viewers will as well.

Matt

Re: Grandpa's Workshop Part Deux

Tom,

It's great to see your grandfather's legacy live on. Too often the old tried-and-true tools and machines get cast aside and deteriorate into uselessness. Nice work in preserving this collection.

Matt Jackson

Re: Model & Measure Part One: Hip Rafters De-mystified by Visualizing in SketchUp

syco,

I'm glad to know you find these helpful.
In producing the videos and related blog post I try to cover a topic, as I see it, completely, but it would be easy for me to miss something that might be important to viewers. So let me know if you have any questions about this hip roof framing series or any other topics covered at The Digital Jobsite.

Thanks for watching and commenting.

Matt Jackson

Re: Chiroptophobics Beware

renosteinke,

That could be a tough choice: mosquitoes or guano? Come to think of it, maybe guano wouldn't be so bad at that :-)

Re: Car Cathedral

Talk about a Garage-mahal... wow! Please post some photos when the project is complete?

Re: A steam bent bridge

Steam bent 4x6 white oak? Nice work! I'm curious how long you had to steam those to make them bendable. And also why you chose to laminate bend the handrail pieces rather than steam them as well.
Very impressive, Mike, very impressive.

Re: How To Save a Miscut Board From the Scrap Bin

Chuck,

Its great to see you promote such a fantastic product.

The best part is that the stuff is inexpensive and available in 55 gallon drums. I've been using it for years to save money. I just buy 8' two by fours when I need 10 footers. Just slosh a couple buckets on a bunk of them at the end of the day, cover it with a tarp overnight and the next morning, I've got all the 10 footers I need.

Truly fantastic stuff indeed!

Re: High-Tech Brushless Motors Hit the Cordless-Tool Marketplace

Justin,

Thanks for sharing this cutting-edge tool info.

My battalion of cordless tools are on the short list for an upgrade so brushless options are of particular interest as I shop and consider replacement tools.

You covered the aspect of brushes vs brushless in cost benefit terms for life of brushes and cost of replacement that shines a bright light on any potential manufacturer hype.

You also mention power loss in friction from brushes and that eliminating brushes saves battery power. Do you have any in-depth figures of what the power saving percentage might be? I'm (clearly) not an engineer so just looking at those little brushes with such small contact surface on the armature makes me curious of the net effect of eliminating friction from brushes. Since rubbing brushes aren't making a direct connection like wires in brushless are I can imagine other inefficiencies which would contribute to power savings from the new brushless design as well.

I'd sure appreciate any info you might have access to.

Re: Model & Measure: Hip Roof Framing De-Mystified by Modeling in SketchUp

Donluke,

Thanks for your positive comments... it helps make the time spent posting more rewarding.

If this tutorial helps you along the road towards more efficient (and thereby more productive)modeling in SketchUp then I'll consider it a success.

Part Three of this series is forthcoming and after that I have yet to determine.

Re: Locate Your Building on a Plot Plan with SketchUp

ARV109:

I'm a PC guy so wouldn't be any help if the download fail is a MAC issue. Have you downloaded any other PlugIns into SketchUp and just the Survey Tool doesn't work or won't any plugins work?

I would suggest that you try to download another plugin like the Volume one in the Mud Math post on the Digital Jobsite and see if that works.

If neither do its probably that you need to learn how to get Ruby Script Plugins to work in general. If it is just the Survey Tool that doesn't work you should be able to find help in SketchUp Plugin forums online because other MAC users will most likely have encountered any incompatibility issues.

Good luck... and check back for more at The Digital Jobsite when you have time..

Re: Switch-Up to SketchUp: Going Digital With Design

Harryman,
I think you'll find SketchUp worth any time and effort you put into learning it. Like any new software experience, ther is a learning curve involved but SU is pretty intuitive and there is a bunch of tutorial help out there to assist you with the process. Stay tuned to The Digital Jobsite for more...

Re: Switch-Up to SketchUp: Going Digital With Design

JoBu:
You're welcome... glad to hear some of this is helping you make the switch to digital design. Let me know if you encounter specific situations that arise as you build SU models. I've found that any (well, most) modeling problems can be overcome and each time I've worked through some particular frustration it helped make the process quicker, more efficient and more effective.
And, no problem on not editing out the small mistakes and glitches. What you see in the tutorials us usually the 3rd or 5th time through... the first run-through is typically pretty sad... they would make anyone starting out think "hey, I'm actually pretty good with this drawing process" <:-P

Re: Switch-Up to SketchUp: Going Digital With Design


Thanks for the positive feedback... it's good to know others are learning benefits of SketchUp at The Digital Jobsite!
MSketcher:
You've got a good point about the perception of "free software" as inferior by nature. I've purposely used only the most current but free version of SketchUp in my work and tutorials so viewers aren't excluded for lack of the $500 entry fee for Pro. Truthfully, I've yet to encounter a situation where I go "darn, I wish I had Pro so I could do this". It supports my long-held belief of "its not what you have but rather how you use it that counts".
BTW the tile tutorial you mentioned was "Digitile: Use a SketchUp Model to Layout, Estimate, and Build a Takeoff List for a Tiling-Job" here at The Digital Jobsite. I hope you continue to "stop by" and contribute with insight from your experinces.

Re: Design snapshot: Classic carriage-house doors

"A row of raised panels has been replaced with flat-panel substitutes"... SO sad! Sad for the circumstances that lead to the decision that must have been made "Awh, just slap some plywood in them holes, it doesn't matter". Sad like touching up a damaged Mona Lisa with sharpie markers.

Idealism aside, it's great to see such classic design and millwork survive in any condition at all, showcased for all to appreciate.

Re: How to bend baseboard around a curved wall

Nathan,
I'm curious: what advantage is there with the notched end method you describe over a conventional coped corner? Seems that by simply square cutting the end of the bent piece and then using a standard (and quicker) full-coped end on the straight piece you would gain more restraint on the curved piece and spend less time than with the interlocking cope/notch shown.

Also, did you have to fight the face of the base to keep it from bowing out in the middle from the curved kerf cuts? It looks flat in the photos but seems like it would be troublesome.

Good work regardless...

Re: Design snapshot: The art of the stone wall

I too see the ad hoc beauty in this type of stone wall but can't help but wonder what the determined souls who stacked each and every one of those boulders with a grunt and a snort would think of us contemplating it as art. Regardless, their strain is our gain in admiring the enduring result of their effort.

Re: Handrail

Nice work!

Re: Mud Math: Figuring Concrete Volume with SketchUp

josefchalat,

Thanks for sharing this info. Apparently I didn't look long or hard enough to find the volume script you describe. If you have a minute to spare it would be beneficial to learn what "other fancy little SketchUp tricks" you use the plugin for.

For other viewers that are interested, this site:

http://www.cad-addict.com/2008/11/sketchup-plugins-volume-calculator.html

(found with the suggested Google search) has a link to download the script as well as some info on using it.

I used the script on the model created for the video and although an "ambiguous form?" warning popped after I filled in the dialog box, the cubic yard value was accurate. The script is written to create a duplicate "group" or "component" which it uses to calculate the volume with various choices as to what to do with the original geometry. I found it simplest to just hit the "back" arrow after getting the volume calculation rather than deleting the new group and/or un-hiding the original.

Just for fun I an alternate volume unit and got a reading of 5,892.29 gallons for the model. Next I want to check the reaction of the guy at the local batch plant when I put in a will call for 5,900 GALLONS of concrete. Should be interesting!

Re: Locate Your Building on a Plot Plan with SketchUp

TomLev,

There is a whole aspect of SketchUp that I know next to nothing about: Sandbox Tools. The little I do know leads me to believe that they would be the ticket for modeling a sloped/contoured lot in detail and then placing a structure on it. I'm sure it would take a fair amount of on site surveying to gather the necessary data to complete an accurate model though.

Without going to that extent, if a lot was fairly flat but sloped, elevation data from the corners and a few key transition points could be modeled into a few basic sloped planes. A foundation outline could then be placed onto the basic contour and measured in similar manner to the flat-lot example.

I'll conduct an informal poll on your request for a tutorial to show the process on a sloped lot (in the less-extensive method) and post it if a few more "yes" votes are cast.

Glad you've enjoyed the tutorials... stop by The Digital Jobsite anytime you get the chance.

Thanks,
Matt AKA The Timber Tailor


Re: Use SketchUp to Figure Crown Moulding Compound Miter Angles

Donluke,

Glad you found this helpful. It comes to mind that the thorough process as shown in the tutorial could be streamlined by avoiding the part of tracing the curved profile with Photo Match. If you just measure the straight surfaces that represent the back of a particular moulding and use a straight line for the face, the resulting compound miter angles would be the same. Let me know if I'm making sense here. If not I'll do another tutorial so visitors can visualize it.

Thanks for stopping by The Digital Jobsite.

Re: The Smart Meter's Contentious Opponents

The quote: "some utility customers say their rates have increased dramatically since smart meters were installed in their homes" points out one of the principle functions of smart metering (as I understand it) which is to assess power costs to users based on their actual usage, not as an average of similar consumer's use.

Customers are also likely to see their electric costs drop if their power consumption falls outside "peak demand" use times. The primary benefit as I see it is that smart meters allow individual users to determine how they spend their electric use dollars.

I admit ignorance on the EMF radiation issue but imagine that when real-world facts are presented the effects will be insignificant in our world of numerous other sources of similar energy emissions.

Re: Stealth Door With Heavy-Duty Hidden Hinges

Matt,

Cool project and nicely done. Thanks for taking the time to share it.
A client had me build a somewhat similar door for a room to store a fully decorated Christmas tree. The door ended up 8' tall and 6' wide with wall texture and paint applied to make it "go away". I used some very large (and not inexpensive) Soss hinges which worked well, but they didn't have the adjust-ability like the Sugatsune brand you use. I'll shop for some of them next time the need arises.

Matt
The Timber Tailor

Re: Designer's Touch: Create Light Fixtures for Your SketchUp Model

DC

Thanks for taking the time to post such an insightful comment. Its in-depth perspective will benefit those who visit The Digital Jobsite by helping them evaluate the level of detail appropriate for their models whether it be "bare bones" or full-on "fluff". Either way, SketchUp is a great way to achieve the desired end result.

Matt

Re: Carpentry Ethics

Larry, thanks for posing such an interesting topic for discussion! It's good to read how others deal with this issue.

As a self-employed contractor I primarily work alone, either in the shop or on a remodeling jobsite. In either case, I must make "ethics" and quality control issues many times in any given day. Over the years (30+ in the trades) one of the best guiding principles I've learned is:

"If it takes a little work to make something a lot better, its worth it. If it takes a whole lot of work to make something just a little bit better, it's probably not worth it."

It's usually quite easy to make a decision after running it through this test.

Matt

Re: The Ultimate Carpenter's Work Bench

Ron,
Interesting concept... and nice work on the SketchUp model!

Matt

Re: Lenox has a New Hole Saw

Next time I'm buyin, I'll be tryin' these out. Looks like a winner if the teeth stay sharp long enough.

Re: Carpentry Ethics

This is outside the carpentry ethics discussion, but I couldn't help but run some numbers.

Here's a look at the math for hanging 60 doors a day assuming an 8 hour day:

8hrs x 60min= 480min
480min/ 60 doors= 8 minutes per door!?

Even a 10 hour day leaves only 10 minutes per door! Wow. Factored into that has to be set up time, moving from house to house and just man-handling all those doors. Its a statement for efficiency if nothing else.

Matt

Re: Bosch's 360-Degree Dual-Plane Laser Level is Affordable and Versatile

Justin,

Thanks for the Bosch laser review. Based on the features you describe it looks like a great tool indeed.

Matt

Re: A few of the rooms I remodeled in my house

Rob,

The sunroom is particularly impressive. Nice.

Re: Lead Paint: The Fines Are Real

I suppose it was only a matter of time until "they" found someone to make an example of. There's probably a lot more to the story, but this type of crackdown is likely to have serious implications.

Re: Stairmathter: Use SketchUp to Master the Math for Stairbuilding

TahoeContractor,

Creating the videos has been a challenging and (usually) rewarding undertaking. If they are an inspiration for you to tackle SketchUp, you're certainly welcome! I too approached this "new" technology in fits-and-starts and found, like you will, that it gets easier and more beneficial over time.

Feel free to post here or contact me if you encounter any specific challenges. I will try to help out if I can. Any time I've run into a frustrating problem, learning how to work around it has always increased my productivity and decreased my frustration.

Matt
aka The Timber Tailor

Re: The "Skin in the Game" Game

For insight into how the country ended up in the financial mess we're in, The Big Short: Inside The Doomsday Machine by Michael Lewis is a must-read.

If sensible creditworthiness measures being considered are "draconian" as Ellen Marshall is quoted above as saying, I wonder how she describes the current mortgage default and foreclosure rates? The financial hardship is what I'd define as draconian.

Re: Home Office

NHA Accents,
Are you the cabinet maker as well as the designer? Looks like a first-class installation. Kudos to all the craftsmen involved!

Re: Digitile: Use a SketchUp Model to Layout, Estimate, and Build a Takeoff List for a Tiling-Job

Hey Guys,

Thanks for your encouraging comments. I'm glad to learn you're adapting SU in similar methods to simplify and improve your work. Great minds think alike?

While the content and direction for the Digital Jobsite to date is arbitrary (haphazard?) if there is a particular SketchUp topic or challenge readers would like covered I could make an effort to dedicate a blog post to address it.

Stay Tuned...

Matt
aka The Timber Tailor

Re: Stairmathter: Use SketchUp to Master the Math for Stairbuilding

It's encouraging to read the growing list of comments posted here. I'm glad to see the content is beneficial, at least to some: Nathan, mykolapok and shirazj for example ((shirazj, can I hire you as a publicist? :-)) although its apparent I've yet to convince others of the benefits SketchUp provides.

It's my intent to use comments, both positive and negative, as direction to develop content at the Digital Jobsite to advance the proficiency of carpenters of all skill levels. For me, the carpentry part comes easy but the video/blog/writing/production part is obviously a work in progress.

I hope you all will stop by the Digital Jobsite from time to time to check on my progress and possibly pick up a few ideas on how to use SketchUp to your benefit.

Matt
aka The Timber Tailor

Re: Download the SketchUp Model of the Ultimate Miter-Saw Stand

tennisball,

Its a .skp file. First download and install Google SketchUp by clicking the link above which will take you to:

http://sketchup.google.com/

Once the SketchUp is installed just click on the "download the 3D model here" link. It will open SketchUp and the 3D file. It may say "read only file" but it is a fully functional 3D model.

Hope that helps!

Matt
aka The Timber Tailor

Re: Download the SketchUp Model of the Ultimate Miter-Saw Stand

For viewers unfamiliar with Google SketchUP:

To get a perfect view of the inner workings of the Ultimate Miter Saw Stand after you download the SketchUp model,click on the "X-Ray View" tool. This unique feature, combined with the Orbit tool allows you to see how the extension slides and drawers are configured to fit into the compact space inside the stand. The clever design might be just the motivation to build one of these for yourself.

Matt
aka The Timber Tailor

Re: Name This Detail

Uhhhh, Prehistoric ridge vents maybe?

The Timber Tailor

Re: Using a Zip Line for Quick Demo Removal - AKA "The Flying Bathtub"

Ingenious "outside the box" thinking! (or should that be "outside the dumpster" thinking?!) Looks like the kind of idea that will evolve in future setups.

I can imagine a setup with a pole at the far end of the dumpster and a trip line rigged so an operator at the 3rd floor window could send a can down the line, stop it right over the dumpster, pull the trip line to tip and empty the can and then retrieve it without even having to leave the building.

Excellent, guys, excellent.

Matt

Re: Drawing Board: Designing Sunscreens

You could take this Sunscreen planning thing to a whole new level with Google SketchUp's 3D design software.

By creating a simple model of a suncreen design, placing it on a simple 3D elevation of the planned installation structure and then geopositioning the model in Google Earth, a person could study the sun/shadow movement during any day, time and place on the planet. Talk about accurate planning for size and appearance of a proposed installation; it would be difficult to be more thorough.

Should this be of interest to you, post a comment at The Digital Jobsite blog here at finehomebuilding.com

Matt

Re: Do You Remeber Your First Issue?

Like Cheating on a Test

The fact that I don't remember when or where I first encountered FHB is more a statement of the condition of my memory than a shortcoming of the magazine.

The thing I do remember is also the reason why I'm still a subscriber after 25+ years. Many times over those years, similar to Woodwolf's comments, when a particular challenge came up at work, the answer would be there in FHB in an article or the Tips and Techniques section. With insight gained from reading the magazine I'd show up with the answer to the problem using somebody else's knowledge. Sort of like cheating on a test, but in the School of Hard Knocks, its a great way to learn and the essence of this quote by Ralph Waldo Emerson: "Our knowledge is the amassed thought and experience of innumerable minds"


Thanks FHB for providing the "classroom" for advancing the knowledge and skill level of worthy students of the trades.

Re: I'll Fly if You'll Buy

Rats! Sure fooled me, but good for a laugh.

Re: Calling All Tool Experts: Can you name this tool?

Seriously folks, it's a lockset installation tool. I have a number of similar tools saved from time spent installing commercial grade locksets. This type of tool typically comes with each of the higher quality grade locksets, often with a hex wrench or two for installing the hardware.

The pin on the left end (as seen in the photo) is used for depressing a pin or tab to release the knob and/or also the "rosette" trim. The bent "fingers" on either side of the main body are used in combination with the small pins on the sides of the "head" as a spanner wrench of sorts to rotate, on or off, the plates that secure the lockset to the faces of the door.

The dimensions are unfamiliar to me, but it looks as though they are for locating holes and hardware on the door slab. If you were to bump the bent fingers to the edge of the door, the arrows would indicate dimensions pertinent to the specific lockset the tool came with.

The tool in this photo appears to be flattened out. The ones I have have an offset handle which allows clearance to turn the wrench. And, just maybe, it makes a better bottle opener with the flat handle :-)

Matt

Re: Calling All Tool Experts: Can you name this tool?

I thought everyone had one of these... its obviously a bottle opener, cleverly disguised so it doesn't look out of place in a workingman's toolbox. The tabs on either side are so those of either the left-handed or right-handed persuasion are well able to deftly flick the top off a bottle of their favorite beverage. All that writing is just part of the camouflage having nothing to do with the tool's purpose. Apparently its working as intended.

Matt

Re: My Story As Told By Houses -- Part 3: The Old Frame House

Larry,

I hope you plan to keep the stories coming... vivid stories from your past cause me to reflect on a remarkably similar history from my childhood. Many stories of modern hardship pale in comparison to memories of sleeping in unheated spaces under a featherbed temporarily warmed by a stove-heated iron.

Looking forward to the next episode...

Matt

Re: What Have I Gotten Myself Into?

Hi Pat,

Your shed project looks to me like a poster child for for The Digital Jobsite blog! Google SketchUp is the perfect solution to answer all your size, proportion, window placement and budget questions. In case you aren't familiar with the features SketchUP has to offer you can get a little insight right "next door" at:

http://www.finehomebuilding.com/blog/digital-job-site

I'd welcome the opportunity to collaborate.

Matt
The Digital Jobsite

Re: What You Don't Know Can Kill You

Ron,

A very thought provoking "article". It confirms my long held belief in the saying "you begin life with a bag full of luck and an empty bag of experience. The trick is to fill the bag with experience before you empty the bag of luck". No simple task existing in the world you describe. My sincere condolences to young Amanda's family.

Provoked in thought,

Matt

Re: My Story As Told By Houses-- Part 1, The Soddy

Larry,

Nice piece of work! Fantastic writing, once again. Much of your writing is about how to build stuff. Can you offer any insight into how you got to be such an excellent author? Your talent is both inspiring and intimidating to this wanna-be writer.

With Respect,

Matt

Re: hard to drive or walk home to take a leak

Its mind boggling the number of people, from building contractor, foundation crew to carpenters, all the way through to the crew that poured the driveway that must have said "I'm just doing my job" and ignored the ridiculously obvious problem-in-the-making in the driveway photo I'm constantly amazed that this kind of stuff happens...

Matt

Re: OMG! Another beam repair with the customary "Tail Light Guarantee"

Yikes!! I think this needs to be added to all the fine work shown at "thereifixedit.com" It would rank right up there with some of the best!

Re: You know they designed the attic ventilation to take care of this!!!!!!

WOW! Just when you think you've seen it all, huh?!
Looks like great material for your next advertising campaign explaining how important home inspectors are!

Re: What's Wrong With This Picture?

I would take a serious look at the feasibility of raising the header up into the floor system making it flush with the tops of the engineered joists with full bearing on the top plate of the wall. The lower header would be raised with new jack studs (as Carola says) to provide solid bearing support. This would require a longer beam and hangers for all the joists but would clean up the ceiling plane. Another drawback would be limitations on what ductwork or plumbing could be run through the ceiling cavity but should be considered as a possible solution IMHO.

Matt
The Timber Tailor

Re: How to Repair a Roof Flashing Boot (in a Flash)

Pedler,

Geocel is a great product but I would not be comfortable gobbing on a big enough bead of it, or anything else, to seal up this vent pipe. It would take at least a 3/4" bead (is it still called a bead when it gets that wide?) for the gap between the pipe and metal. Nope, sounds to me just like a call back waiting to happen...

Matt

Re: My New Favorite Power Tool

Pat,
What's not to love? All that POWER at your fingertips... saweet! Although I've always been a Stihl guy, any professional grade saw is quite satisfying to use as you've found. To keep "that lovin' feeling" for my saw, I always make it a point to keep the chain razor sharp. Any amount of power is useless with a dull chain so I use a bar-mount sharpener of this type:
http://norwalkpower.com/stihl56100007500barmountfilingtool.aspx
to file the cutters anytime they dull from use or an accidental poke of the bar tip in the dirt. Work safe with that new weapon of yours!
Matt Jackson
The Timber Tailor

Re: PIECE WORKERS in the Construction Trades

Great history lesson, Larry. Nicely done. My feelings and observations trend with richard904 and my livelihood as a carpenter/ contractor depends on the demand for diverse abilities. People looking for "one-stop shopping" in their contractor. Interesting how demand seems to be coming around, full circle.
Looking forward to more of your posts.

Matt
The Timber Tailor

Re: White Oak Entertainment Center

Nice work, Norm! Very pleasing appearance in proportions, features and finish. Is this a customer project or for your own home? Its great to see this level of craftsmanship in the knock-down, particleboard times we're living and working in.

Re: Use SketchUp to create a 3D framing model

Hey filch,

Thanks for following along. SU is such a great visual program to use it should really help get your shed planned out before you start building. I'll do what I can to help.

Although I can't tell exactly what trouble you are having with the program, my first thought is that you might be using the "scale" tool instead of the "move" tool. That would change the size of the plate component but might look like you are moving them. Or possibly you are attempting to move the plates in the "component edit" mode. That could make only selected parts of the plates move and in effect change the size instead.

If you take the subfloor perimeter line, turn it into a component, edit that component to the size you want for your plates and then make sure you exit the component edit mode before selecting your plate component with the move tool to place it on the subfloor component, it should work. It goes without saying that there are any number of ways to create plates for a SU model but the method you are following in the video is a pretty straightforward way to get it done.

Hope this helps...

Matt

Re: Use SketchUp to create a 3D framing model

Great dialog here guys, thanks for taking the time to comment.
Looks like some questions are already answered, like the Debut Video Capture. Being more of a carpenter than a "geek" I just picked software that wasn't too expensive and seemed to have features that would work well for this blog; so far, so good.

Like every real jobsite I've been on, I learn something new every day, and I expect this Digital Jobsite will be the same. I've still got a lot to learn about using groups and layers to simplify modeling so tips and techniques are welcome.

So far the direction of this blog has been towards demonstrating how useful a tool SketchUp is without getting too deep into details. Part D is intended to show use of rotate, move and copy tools without "proper framer's protocol for stud spacing" complicating things. The great thing about the program is that it can accommodate a wide range of detail from basic to board-by-board planning, again, depending on the desired end result. So future posts can show more carpentry layout information in addition to the tutorial information.

Stay tuned for more...

Re: Light in the Tunnel: A Moldy Crawlspace Nightmare Part 4

Edola,

I created the lifting fixtures specifically for this job in a design I came up with for the particular situtation I was confronted with. I whipped them up in my shop with some scrap steel I had on hand. Any local steel fab shop should be able to make something similar for your job conditions at a price.

I could add a close-up photo of the fixtures to the blog post if you are interested.

Matt Jackson
The Timber Tailor

Re: A Moldy Crawlspace Nightmare

"The Gasman Cometh" is great! I can only imagine it recited in a thick Irish brogue. Surprising that I haven't heard it recited by any clients over the years considering all the "one thing leads to another" type projects they hire me for.

Re: Tablesaw Safety, Liability, and Common Sense on the Jobsite

There is no such thing as too much emphasis on power tool safety. With a few "when we do dumb things, dumb things happen" events on my resume, I've adopted a consistent practice: USE PUSH STICKS!! I made a stack of them in a very functional design to keep a plentiful supply by each woodworking/finger-cutting tool I use. I find them a very useful, affordable and effective safety measure in lieu of the ideal: Saw-Stop technology on every tool. As an added reminder to use them, I inscribe each one with the words

"Keep Between Fingers and Blade"

on one side, and

"DO NOT Use Remaining Fingers as Push Sticks"

on the other side.

Work safe!

Re: UPDATED: Win a Tool with Our Podcast Brain Teaser

I'm going with this method:

He removed the fan belt (2 decades ago vehicles still had 'em) using his socket set. Using the 110v electric drill, powered by the 110v generator, with the appropriate size socket to fit the bolt on the pulley he spins the alternator/generator fast enough and long enough to charge up the battery sufficiently to start the engine. With the battery charged, he puts the belt back on, starts the engine and hits the road for home. Hopefully he at least caught a few fish before work to make the episode worthwhile!

Re: Quik and consistant Reveals

Doug,

Just to follow up, I made a set of reveal blocks using your idea. While I was at it I made 3 blocks:

1/8 and 1/4
3/16 and 3/8
5/16 and 1/2

figuring they should cover all the bases (well, except for 7/16). I drilled two 1" holes in each for easier handling. I'll attach a picture of the blocks if I can figure out how.

Re: Our cover is not all that's new

In lieu of something meaningful or serious for the tagline, how about one of these anagrams using all the letters in
Fine Homebuilding:

Humbled Genii Info
Imbued Life Honing
Fine, I Bludgeon Him
Budge Him If Online
Uhinged if mobile
Big Heedful Minion

or a couple possibilities using Fine Homebuilding Magazine:

Filming Genuine Zombi Ahead
Mobilizing Genuine Deaf Ham

None of these are going to help sell magazines, but would have to make at least a few people laugh, don't ya think?

Re: Quik and consistant Reveals

Great idea, Doug! I'm makin' a set of these next time I'm working in the shop... finally, a purpose for those walnut cut-offs that were much to nice to just throw in the wood stove.

Matt

The Timber Tailor