sawzall316

Chicago, IL, US
member


sawzall316
Free lance carpenter for 27 years.
Trim work is my passion but you go where the work is.
Working on my residential electrical lisencing.
I don't do plumbing.(Chicago area will not move towards Pex)



Recent comments


Re: Will Double Stud Wall Construction Bring Efficiency at a Modest Cost?

This type of building will likely stay in the fringe world of modern construction for certain rural areas where exterior space is not an issue. For urban buildings that kind of methodology of building means no usable floorspace in a home or unit. Building a double wall also means higher building costs and a higher price point for profitability...very few customers will be willing to pay that premium. And I must repeat what I mentioned before, property taxes are based on external dimensions of structures. How do you sell that having significantly less space will have one paying much more taxes per usable square footage?

Re: What's Wrong With This Picture?

josefchalat has it completely correct. It looks just odd, and it will forever be a reminder of a basic failure in design and execution. How does one trim things out when you are faced with this visual eye sore. Just because the owner wanted those windows, in response to a previous comment, does not mean he gets them when one can explain the over all issues involved and what the end product will look like. Believe me, I have never had, seen or heard of a customer going with an extreme flub once the over all issue was explained and a reasonable solution is found.

Re: Future Deck Codes - Round the corner in 2015???

Many of the code updates are needed refinements and necessary for modern structure. That said, however, it does raise the overall cost of even the simplest of structures to levels that will scare away homeowners. I read somewhere that 90% of all decks are built without permits. This is not surprising given the raised complexities and costs involved in building even a basic deck. Here in Chicago, there is no distinction made with respect to the size of the deck and its structural components and procedures. A 3x4 platform must be built like a 10x15 deck...16x16x12footing with a rebar schedule into a 12" sono-tube pier with its rebar schedule: a min. 6x6 posts: doubled 2x12 beams bolted with 2xChicago bolts, each beam end must sit on a large gauge steel bracket...I can go on...you get the drift. The standard City sanctioned deck is GOD ugly, but their designed to figuratively hold up fully laden battleships at 100 lb per square foot. With those requirements, homeowners cannot afford to build anything bigger than a postage stamp for a deck these days.

Re: Should Builders Provide Free Estimates?

Every few years this topic comes around and I laugh at the guys like "Mike Smith." It is part of the business, the expense of preparing the bid can be expensed into the bid if you get it or it can be written off as a loss in one's tax filings if you do not get the job. It's not rocket science. Let "Mike" charge for a bid, I'll be walking in the door behind him and taking the job because he just shot himself in the foot.

Re: Podcast: The New Cost of Lead-Safe Remodeling

Wow, talk about a business killer. I just do not see a significant amount of homeowners going along with a 50% cost addition to a project. Over time these issues will go away through the attrition of older homes but that is a lifetime away.
Maybe I should look into more landscaping work as a career...

Re: Larry Haun (1931-2011)

Wow. I have to take a step back and sit a spell. Like everyone, I am stunned to hear the news. As a young carpenter, and even now, Larry was a Hero of mine. A man of modest origins who made it big and maintained his humble compass. I would have given anything to have worked with Larry. He was an amazing man. I really can't say much more at this time, I am speachless...

Re: Feds Consider Unprecedented Safety Rules for Tablesaws

JFink,
I think full disclosure is required. To the best of my knowledge, the Osorio case was initiated by his workmans comp. insurance in Carlos Osorio's name. Mr Osorio was not a carpenter, infact Mr Osorio's knowledge of table saws was next to nothing. Because of workmans comp.,the company he worked for is insulated from legal harm even though they did not provide training in the use of table saws. What can be gleamed from the court proceedings is that Mr Osorio was not the sharpest tool in the shed. That being said, the courts decision was that the technology exists to drasticly reduce the likelyhood of this type of harm despite the operators incompetance.
As I have writen in other postings, It is the insurance companies that are pushing for this type of legislation since they are footing the bill for careless individuals. And it makes for common sense, why should "ABC" insurance pay medical bills for "Mr. careless" when the tech exists to drasticly reduce harm while the manufactures refuse to impliment it or provide the option to do so. Tablesaw manufactures got very poor legal advise early on; in short, their crack legal teams said to stick your head in the sand not realizing that huge legal liability existed the longer time went bye and the tech proved reliable. The bottom line now is one buisness sector will be going after anougher to ofset their monitary burden; we are all sitting on the sidelines watching it unfold.

Re: Window Flashing - New-Construction Best-Practice Tyvek Method

Hey Matt,
Nice video on what is the industry standard on window and also door installs. For those who don't follow this enhanced method, it is the method that almost all window/door manufactures require for warranty validation of their product when installation is on frame housing.

For your average track/spec home, yes, you will likely never see this method but that is a short term gain that will bite you on the backside at some point in callbacks---do the math, a potenial four to six callbacks if you do good volume within the next year will evaporate any perceived gain you thought you had.

As far as the sill is concened, a bead of silicon applied only on the inside of the window seals things up nicely---minimaly expanding foam after install is anougher method commonly used.

Again, a good video on a text book install---nice job.

Re: Framing Rough Openings for Prehung Doors

I love when guys like bobtb snipe at Larry. It shows their ignorance of who Larry is and what he has contributed to modern framing techniques.

Re: Carpentry Ethics

amazingrace,
I certainly do not blame you, you where building what was called for on approved plans. The Contractor and Architect have much more reponsibility because they had the primary interaction with the client and should have screened the client's actual needs.
Just out of curousity, how long did it take to complete the garage? The reason I ask is I've witnessed the local garage outfits build a completed 2car in one day less power. The electrician shows up within a few days. If it's me any my crew, its a 2 to 2-1/2 day turn.

Re: Carpentry Ethics

Well Feeg,
As a 50 yr production/manufacturing manager you have the right thought proccesses and IMO enough gravitas to certainly comment on the topic. After all, what is building a stucture but a well choreographed manufacturing endeavor. IMO, you stated the issue very well so no need to apologize.
Now,that "Judgement factor" in the building trades is honed over time, and that indiscriminate empowerment as you put it is exercized because reality is stranger than fiction requiring you to fly by the seat of your pants at times. Yes not everybody is skilled or conscientious as to what shortcuts matter but that can always be mitigated by ones company culture---It sets the tone and ethics the tradesmen follow.

Re: Carpentry Ethics

I don't see the problem that others have with Larry's methods. My take is that you can provide great work within reasonable tolerances and still produce a superior product that meets or exceeds minimum requirments and that in no way compromises ones ethics.
As a young carpenter in the early eighties, I did as I was taught initially but a new set of eyes can at times see a better way. There was always a new guy with new ideas and the resistance of the older guys to these new methods. Change is slow unless you can demonstraight practicality. When I was asked by a friend of mine to come down to Austin,Tx in the mid-late eighties, I was sufficiantly full of myself and my skills. Boy, did I ever learn. Building here in the Chicago area at the time there wasn't a hard push to beat timelines. It took what it took and what the bids timeline required, usually more but defintly not less. The mentality/methods where very differant in Austin. They had implimented many of the production methods that Larry has come to be known for. I'll be the first to say it's not for every guy as I learned. I managed to hold my own but these guys where machines---Every motion was a lesson in efficancy. The point is that I thought at the time that these "new methods" were sloppy. Over the course of that summer I came to realize that I'm was not building pianos and other fine furniature and that a eight or 1/4" off in most framing is not the end of the world. For example,how is 3/16" out of plumb in a 9 or 10 foot wall height change anything---it doesn't. If you work within acceptable tolerances and methods, you produce a fine structure that makes money and gives you satisfaction in a job well done.

Re: Top 10 Tips for Wall Framing Layout on a New Subfloor

Yah Mike, I don't know about Grice's choice on carring a hammer that way. It does look goofy.
As far as Larry's awl, well thats a hold over from his early days when carpenters were real carpenters, they carried a hell of alot more tools and did every facet of the job including cutting everything by hand. In case you cannot see, Larry's is not a spring chicken. Larry's also a skinny guy, but I'll tell you this, he's framed more homes than both you or I combined. Many of the technics we use today were developed by Larry and his crew back in the day.

Re: Top 10 Tips for Wall Framing Layout on a New Subfloor

Oscarmann just reminded me of a brief stint in Austin,Tx back in 80s building boom. My buddy invited me down to lend a hand---these guys were framing two houses a week with no end insight. In brief, Senco came out on a promotional and was giving away a framing nailgun, compressor and accesories to the first man who could come within 65 to 70% of the nailgun output for some given count. I don't remember all the specifics but for all of us that was out of the question with the exception of "Framin Raymon". Raymon had framed for so long and consistantly that his right arm was disportionally larger than his left. His left hand was... well, it was made to roll nails out, you had to see it. Yes, Raymon won that kit much to the Senco reps amazement. Set and sink, set and sink, never ending. Yah, I'm glad thoughs days are over too---there's no way I could do that anymore.

Re: Top 10 Tips for Wall Framing Layout on a New Subfloor

Well as far as my experiance takes me, the type of chalk used depended on expected whether conditions. If you have the misfortune to laying out plates on the eve of bad whether and you have to make your GC happy, hair spray becomes your best friend. That said, I do not know a carpenter that did not have multiple chalklines of various grades handy, you always have to hedge your bets. The black chalk that Larry shows is not a typical color but if it's rain resistant, what ever works.
Now as far as laying out plates with one or two lines, I can see oscarmann's point but a production plater is typically not someone who just fell off the turnip wagon. Yes, there are some mistakes made once in awhile but a larger percent of time it over whelmingly saves huge amounts of time&$$$. You must remember, Larry's talking "production framing" not your framing for say a mid to high end job where your framing one to two homes every once in a while and more than likely accuracy and extratime are factored in. They really are two differant animals. The transition from the latter to the former is not easy.
When I was a Kid, like many, I thought that I was a hotshot. My first job with real production guys gave me a rude awakening and a lesson learned. These guys, like Larry Huan, were machines. Their every move was a lesson in time management honed over many years. I new that I was not nor would I ever be that type of carpenter---humble pie was served.
Now I'm pushing 50 and I don't have anywhere near the energy Larry has. Larry was a legend when I was a kid. It is great to see Larry still at it with the same pashion and desire that is his trademark.

Re: Are Modern Power Tools Junk?

The only tools I use regularly that are "vintage' are my collection of Craftmens halfHP routers. All three have builtin lights so I can see as I work. However, my favorite router was an old RAM (circa 1960s) thats relative to todays trim routers in size and power. Unfortunatly it gave up the ghost last summer. With mainatence, replacing brushes, bushing/bearings over the years these tools will last many more years but the cost of components is such now that it's cheaper to buy a modern counterpart and be done with it.

Re: Lead Paint: The Fines Are Real

I have spoken with a few local painting contractors that I have working relations with here in the Chicago area and they look to be avoiding/minimizing contact with pre78 housing stock or they are limiting the type and methodology of work involved with older housing stock. I suspect very little to no scraping/sanding is the compromise.
It appears that most of their current customer base is willing to live with this arrangement in order to work around the new reg.s and short term cash savings. They are maintaining a good work load as far as I can see. Far better than I'm doing.
Maybe it's just me but these RRP rules are deal breakers for my customer base when I give a bid and the testing/prepwork/disposing of waste can add and extra $1000.00 or more to the bid of even a small renovation. After I follow up, I regularly find that they have gotten the job done thru some fly by night outfit.
You know what an unsigned contract and a wallet are worth----their worth the empty wallet.

Re: How to Reinforce 2x6 Ceiling Joists to Handle Heavy Loads

CubanOriley's method is typical, it's not rocket science for the guy to have the engineer come up with something to give him ease of mind.

Re: Will Double Stud Wall Construction Bring Efficiency at a Modest Cost?

Oldstud built his own personal house in this 2xwall method, fine, his choice. However, given the option of 24"oc 2x6 framing with 2 to 4" rigid foam on the outside and 5.5" of almost any insulation of choice inside will provide more than a reasonable and competative Rvalue for as far anyone can see. I cannot see where the buider will make money and a customer having less useable room will gladly pay more. This whole idea is nuts. Need I mention that everyone gets taxed on the perceived squarefootage of a home, i.e outside perimiter measurement of a home---yes think about that, you will not get a break because you really have much less living space. In this case less is not more and more is $$$out of everyones pocket.

Re: Will Double Stud Wall Construction Bring Efficiency at a Modest Cost?

Ok, How on earth is double walled construction on a single detached family home cost effective? Two by six wall framing with sprayed in foam insulation is very fast and meets or exceeds code and energy efficiency requirement in most locations. Thermo-bridging is effectivly blocked with the addition of rigid foam insulation in the building envelope. Why is double wall framing an issue outside of attached unit housing?

Re: What's Wrong With This Picture?

I lean towards sixthflick's take. We need to see the beam in its entirty and detail relative to the steel column i.e. poured footing.
IMHO, to heck with the windows, they are going to be a bit narrower If it was my job. Put in place proper structure at that end of the beam and the windows must lose 8" each in width. With that you clean up the placement of the window so it looks balanced between the wall and the beam, and all your window casing looks properly balanced. It seems to be the cheapest fix.

Re: SawStop Inventor Walks the Walk

The bottom line to all the sawstop nay sayers, and read these words over in you mind a few times,
The sawstop tech exists---for quite some time now. Either Table saw manufactures get on board or face more goofy lawsuites like the Ryobi case. The one and only thing juries will consider no matter how incompotent and challenged the operater is the technology exits to prevent injury---PERIOD.
There will be no jury on the face of this planet that will move off that known fact---the technology exits to prevent injury. And it is in the manufacture's best interest to start providing it.

Re: Play Fine Homebuilding's Game "The Inspector"

Several points on the framing vs insulation pic,
1)Why is the window spotted so close to the corner? The corner detail is not easy to see to make an informed observation. The window should be over 6" to the right. Its current possition is a loss of a critical shear point. Also, I would be pissed if I had to trim that window since it leaves me with little to no room on the left depending on the desired look to balance the case work given its proximity to the door.
2) The headers didn't need to be that beefy but it is always a good idea to have them over doors and windows. The headers should just be single members placed on the out side thus leaving space for insulation.
3)The double sill plate at the window could just have been a framing flub and it's alot easier to add a 2x so as to not screw the window install later. We have all done it

The other flagged points like studs,criples etc. are a waste of wood. In the Larry Huan method of production work they should have not been placed.

Re: Lunch Pail Podcast - March 19, 2010

No one is debating that accidents on TS' are ones own fault. It does not matter what the excuse is. This demented machismo and twisted logic against saw stop tech has to give way to safty. I, and anyone else will still follow safty protocals when working on a TS, an exposed spinning blade still has comanding respect no matter what tech is designed into the tool.
If the tech was implimented when it 1st came out, all this trash talk would be a none issue and 10s of thousands of accidents would have never have happened, period. This law suit is just the tip of the iceberg, wait untill the patent runs out and ALL manufacturer's start comming out with saw stop tech touting a "NEW ERA IN TS SAFTY". ANYONE who gets hurt with conventional pre-sawstop TS' will be compelled to sue the pants off manufacturers since the tech has existed for many a moon and the manufactures will appear neglegent in implementing it, reguardless as to how many of you feel. The writing is on the wall and clear to see. Lets just hope that the costs that will likly be pasted on to the consumer from these lawsuits doesn't turn around and bankrupt the manufacturers.
I hope that this guy in the lawsuit gets all his $$$. There will be legions of lawyers lining up to get their share of the pie all because the lack of that ounce of prevention now requires a ton of cure.
Yes, one must allways accept personal responsibility, again no one is questioning that but if a device exists that can stem major accidents, why not use it for the geater good and safty of one's customers. Step out of the dark ages boys.

Re: Tablesaw Accident Sparks Million-Dollar Finger

Here we are, 92% of respondents to this poll cannot see the forest through the trees. No one is debating that accidents on TS' are ones own fault. It does not matter what the excuse is. This demented machismo and twisted logic against saw stop tech has to give way to safty. I, and anyone else will still follow safty protocals when working on a TS, an exposed spinning blade still has comanding respect no matter what tech is designed into the tool.
If the tech was implimented when it 1st came out, all this trash talk would be a none issue and 10s of thousands of accidents would have never have happened, period. This law suit is just the tip of the iceberg, wait untill the patent runs out and ALL manufacturer's start comming out with saw stop tech touting a "NEW ERA IN TS SAFTY". ANYONE who gets hurt with conventional pre-sawstop TS' will be compelled to sue the pants off manufacturers since the tech has existed for many a moon and the manufactures will appear neglegent in implementing it, reguardless as to how many of you feel. The writing is on the wall and clear to see. Lets just hope that the costs that will likly be pasted on to the consumer from these lawsuits doesn't turn around and bankrupt the manufacturers.
I hope that this guy in the lawsuit gets all his $$$. There will be legions of lawyers lining up to get their share of the pie all because the lack of that ounce of prevention now requires a ton of cure.
Yes, one must allways accept personal responsibility, again no one is questioning that but if a device exists that can stem major accidents, why not use it for the geater good and safty of one's customers. Step out of the dark ages boys.

Re: Whatever Happened to the Radial-Arm Saw?

I have two Sears RAS'. They come in handy for multiple setups
(dados,rabitts and tendons)that leave the tablesaw open.
As far as ripping with RAS', yes it can be done but just because it can doesn't mean you should. I've seen that accident and I don't want to witness it again.
It's not seen on worksites anymore but I cannot see a small shop without one. RAS' are like routers in that they are very flexable for smaller shops. Larger Shops have more automated machinery that eliminates the need for a RAS.
Watching "Norm" showed me years ago how flexible and useful RAS are in a shop and I've never looked back.

Re: Worm-drives vs. sidewinders? A conversation with Larry Haun.

I'm a little shocked at my fellow lefties that have issues cutting right vs. left. Righties might not know it but Lefties (it's a brain thing) typically are ambidextrous using either hand with almost equal dexterity.
I have use both types, as the work requires. Framing commands a worm. Sheet goods are handled easier with sidewinders. Cutting jigs/sleds usually handle sidewinders better too. In the end, if you are left-handed, you should not have problems adapting to using either style of saw.
The job is the job.