previous
  • Gallery: Custom Flooring
    Gallery: Custom Flooring
  • Magazine Departments
    Magazine Departments
  • Basement Remodeling Tips
    Basement Remodeling Tips
  • Clever daily tip in your inbox
    Clever daily tip in your inbox
  • Remodeling in Action
    Remodeling in Action
  • Read FHB on Your iPad
    Read FHB on Your iPad
  • Solid Deck-Framing Advice
    Solid Deck-Framing Advice
  • Deck Design & Construction
    Deck Design & Construction
  • Energy-Smart Details
    Energy-Smart Details
  • Master Carpenter Videos
    Master Carpenter Videos
  • Video: Build a curved step
    Video: Build a curved step
  • Video Series: Install a Rock-Solid Tile Floor
    Video Series: Install a Rock-Solid Tile Floor
  • Video: Install a Fence
    Video: Install a Fence
  • 7 Small Bathroom Layouts
    7 Small Bathroom Layouts
  • Tips & Techniques for Painting
    Tips & Techniques for Painting
  • 7 Smart Kitchen Solutions
    7 Smart Kitchen Solutions
  • All about Roofing
    All about Roofing
  • 12 Remodeling Secrets
    12 Remodeling Secrets
  • 7 Trim Carpentry Secrets
    7 Trim Carpentry Secrets
  • 9 Concrete Countertops Ideas
    9 Concrete Countertops Ideas
next
Pin It

Tool companies adopt new torque ratings

A new testing method measures the sustained torque of a tool with 95% accuracy

In the 30 or so years that power drills and drill/drivers have been on the market, toolmakers have been competing with each other over torque ratings, or the measure of the tools’ turning force. But because these ratings typically come from in-house or third-party laboratory testing, the equipment and methods vary, and so do the results. Often, the publicized torque ratings are peak measurements (the initial half-second burst of energy when the trigger is pulled) rather than sustained torque, which is a more realistic representation of the tool’s performance during normal use.

A new testing method—recently agreed on by Bosch, Delta/Porter-Cable, Hitachi, Milwaukee, and all other major PTI (www.powertoolinstitute.com) members—measures the sustained torque of each tool with 95% accuracy.

Although it’s voluntary, and so far Makita is the only manufacturer to publicize standardized torque results, the new test method could be a good step toward balanced, apples-to-apples shopping information for power-tool buyers.

Photo by: John Ross
From Fine Homebuilding201 , pp. 24