Putting a new window in an old brownstone - Fine Homebuilding

previous
  • Radiant Heat Comparison
    Radiant Heat Comparison
  • Tips & Techniques for Painting
    Tips & Techniques for Painting
  • Basement Remodeling Tips
    Basement Remodeling Tips
  • Read FHB on Your iPad
    Read FHB on Your iPad
  • Remodeling Articles
    Remodeling Articles
  • All about Roofing
    All about Roofing
  • 7 Small Bathroom Layouts
    7 Small Bathroom Layouts
  • 7 Smart Kitchen Solutions
    7 Smart Kitchen Solutions
  • Video: Install a Fence
    Video: Install a Fence
  • Energy-Smart Details
    Energy-Smart Details
  • 7 Trim Carpentry Secrets
    7 Trim Carpentry Secrets
  • Magazine Departments
    Magazine Departments
  • Clever daily tip in your inbox
    Clever daily tip in your inbox
  • Design Inspiration
    Design Inspiration
  • Master Carpenter Videos
    Master Carpenter Videos
  • Video Series: Tile a Bathroom
    Video Series: Tile a Bathroom
  • 9 Concrete Countertops Ideas
    9 Concrete Countertops Ideas
next


Putting a new window in an old brownstone

comments (1) January 31st, 2011 in Project Gallery
Click the thumbs up button above to vote for this tip. Help us choose Fine Homebuildings top-10 window and door tips. 
Click the thumbs up button above to vote for this tip. Help us choose Fine Homebuildings top-10 window and door tips. Click To Enlarge

Click the "thumbs up" button above to vote for this tip. Help us choose Fine Homebuilding's top-10 window and door tips

Photo: Drawings by Chuck Miller

In Brooklyn, where turn-of-the-century brownstones and bricks are the norm, window replacement often calls for some ingenuity. I have used both Bonneville and Andersen brick-to-brick replacement windows. These units are custom-made to be 1/4 in. narrower than the brick opening, with a brick molding already attached. In theory, they drop into the opening and are strapped to the interior-wall framing with vendorsupplied galvanized straps. Caulk the brick moldings to the bricks, and you’re done. But with solid-brick walls, what do you strap the new window to? When old windows are removed, the area once occupied by the sash weights is now a large void. Rather than make a mountain of unstable framing in the void, I improve on the strap idea. As shown in the drawing, I screw 2-in.-wide strips of 3/4-in. plywood to the sides, bottom, and top of the window. Now I can attach the plywood strips to the stud wall, shimming as necessary to square to the window. The strips then are cut flush with the studs. The strips also serve as support for jamb extensions or drywall. Before installing the drywall, I stuff the sash-weight voids with insulation.

 

Matt Hausmann, Brooklyn, NY 

From Fine Homebuilding 165, pp. 30

 


posted in: Project Gallery, windows, doors

Comments (1)

timbervalley timbervalley writes: 1. rather than "stuff" insulation in the voids, I would use low expanding foam. (Batt insulation loses R-value if compressed and as well does not stop air leakage well.)
2. unfortunately the diagram's text was too small to be readable
Posted: 5:56 pm on February 13th

Log in or create a free account to post a comment.