Undoing the Dings of Life - Fine Homebuilding

previous
  • Clever daily tip in your inbox
    Clever daily tip in your inbox
  • Basement Remodeling Tips
    Basement Remodeling Tips
  • Remodeling Articles and Videos
    Remodeling Articles and Videos
  • Custom Flooring Inspiration
    Custom Flooring Inspiration
  • 7 Trim Carpentry Secrets
    7 Trim Carpentry Secrets
  • Design Inspiration
    Design Inspiration
  • Energy-Smart Details
    Energy-Smart Details
  • 7 Smart Kitchen Solutions
    7 Smart Kitchen Solutions
  • 9 Concrete Countertops Ideas
    9 Concrete Countertops Ideas
  • Tips & Techniques for Painting
    Tips & Techniques for Painting
  • All about Roofing
    All about Roofing
  • Pro Tool Rental
    Pro Tool Rental
  • 7 Small Bathroom Layouts
    7 Small Bathroom Layouts
  • Magazine Departments
    Magazine Departments
  • Video: Install a Fence
    Video: Install a Fence
  • Projects Done Right
    Projects Done Right
  • Video Series: Tile a Bathroom
    Video Series: Tile a Bathroom
  • 12 Remodeling Secrets
    12 Remodeling Secrets
  • Master Carpenter Videos
    Master Carpenter Videos
  • Read FHB on Your iPad
    Read FHB on Your iPad
next

CozyDigz

CozyDigz


Undoing the Dings of Life

comments (2) January 18th, 2013 in Blogs
Olitch Mike Litchfield, Blogger, book author, one of the first FHB editors

To repair dings from doors or trim, hold a damp cloth over the spot, then apply a steam iron to the cloth till the wood swells slightly. Check your progress periodically and be patient.
Renovation 4th Edition contains the collective wisdom of hundreds of master builders and tradespeople across North America. Most of the books photos were taken on job sites as they occurred--real tips in real time.
To repair dings from doors or trim, hold a damp cloth over the spot, then apply a steam iron to the cloth till the wood swells slightly. Check your progress periodically and be patient.Click To Enlarge

To repair dings from doors or trim, hold a damp cloth over the spot, then apply a steam iron to the cloth till the wood swells slightly. Check your progress periodically and be patient.

Photo: Mike Litchfield, Renovation 4th Edition

So. We're standing around in the master bedroom, beaming at the cherry renovation that is just about complete. My buddy Dean Rutherford, his clients and me. It's late afternoon, the sun is golden, the woodwork glows and love is in the air. Just about then one of Dean's crew, some eager-to-please kid, enters carrying something long and metal. He threads his way through the room carefully but pivots a half-second too soon and the trailing end of the metal thing whacks the flawless face of a $300 fir door. The smiles on four faces seize up and the kid looks he's swallowed his paycheck.

But Dean, who once aspired to be a priest and worked in the barrios of Chile, is nothing if not compassionate. And calm. "Oh," he says, regarding the 1/4-in. deep gash in the door. "I can fix that. Got a steam iron?"

I am skeptical and the clients are very quiet. But he does it. He holds a slightly damp cloth over the ding, and applies a steam iron to the cloth till the wood swells slightly. He takes his time and checks his progress periodically. It takes maybe five minutes. Once the heated wood has filled in the gouge he allows the wood to cool, then lightly sands the raised area till it's level. The door had been finished, so later on Dean uses a small artist's brush to apply the same finish--thinned slightly--to the damaged area.

May all the dings in your life iron out as nicely.

Thanks to Dean Rutherford for this tip--just one of the thousands of field-tested tips and techniques that you'll find in Renovation 4th Edition. Brand new from Taunton Press, R4's 614 pages include 250+ technical drawings, 1,000 photos selected from the 40,000 that I've taken over the years, and lifetimes of experience that builders shared with me. I hope you find it useful. -Mike


© Michael Litchfield 2013



posted in: Blogs, finish carpentry, restorations, painting

Comments (2)

Edward1234 Edward1234 writes: Great article! Thanks for sharing.

http://www.brejnik.ca
Posted: 3:01 pm on May 14th

ChicagolandPro ChicagolandPro writes: Great article. There are many different key elements that define hardwood flooring and hardwood flooring restoration. Thanks for sharing.
Wayne@ Palatine Hardwood Flooring
Posted: 10:25 am on January 22nd

Log in or create a free account to post a comment.