Millers Falls Breast Drill No 97 - Fine Homebuilding

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Millers Falls Breast Drill No 97

comments (2) February 9th, 2010 in Project Gallery
GeorgeA5715 GeorgeA5715, member


This drill was patented in 1911, but look at all of its "modern" features:  Cordless, 1/2" keyless chuck, two speed and reversible.  The drill's transmission is beyond anything built today.  It has gears labeled "plain", "LH Ratchet", RH Ratchet", "RH Onward" and LH Onward".  The crank hadle can be mounted at a right angle as shown or in line for greater leverage.  It is 17 inches long and weighs 8 pounds.  I found it at a junk store near Statesboro, GA about 20 years ago.


posted in: Project Gallery, drills and drivers, antique drill

Comments (2)

charlieiii charlieiii writes: Whats a hand saw? :-)
Posted: 10:21 am on February 22nd

potatowilson potatowilson writes: This thing is sweet. Not only is it two speed, but it's variable speed as well. I get a laugh out of people who have forgotten about hand tools. Yankee screwdrivers, push drills, and even hammers have become things of the past. I guess you could say acutal carpenters are becoming few and far between as well. How many modern day framers could actually cut a 2x10 accuratley with a hand saw?
Posted: 6:52 pm on February 11th

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