How to Retrofit a Ceiling Fan Electrical Box - Fine Homebuilding

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The Daily Fix

The Daily Fix


How to Retrofit a Ceiling Fan Electrical Box

comments (0) April 28th, 2009 in Blogs
FHB_WEB FHB_WEB, member

Fan-rated outlet boxes support the extra weight and motion associated with a fan.
Fan-rated outlet boxes support the extra weight and motion associated with a fan.Click To Enlarge

Fan-rated outlet boxes support the extra weight and motion associated with a fan.

Photo: Clifford A. Popejoy

by Clifford A. Popejoy

Before installing a ceiling fan, electrical code requires that you use a fan-rated outlet box that will support the extra weight and the motion associated with a fan. A fan-rated box will be labeled as such inside and typically can support up to 70 lb.



Low profile

Low profile Low profile
A 1⁄2-in.-deep pancake box is meant to be screwed to a joist or block. It’s used if only one cable is coming into the box.



Deeper profile

Deeper profile Deeper profile
A 2-1⁄4-in.-deep box can be attached to blocking between joists and is roomy enough to handle more than one cable. It is also available in a saddle-mount configuration.



No blocking, no problem


No blocking, no problem No blocking, no problem
Paired with a deep box, this hanger is meant to span between two joists and takes the place of wooden blocking.

Read the complete article...
Retrofitting a Ceiling Fan
With common-sense wiring and the right hardware, you can replace an existing light fixture with a breeze in almost any room in the house
by Clifford A. Popejoy
Get the PDF

 


posted in: Blogs, hvac, electrical

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