previous
  • Read FHB on Your iPad
    Read FHB on Your iPad
  • Basement Remodeling Tips
    Basement Remodeling Tips
  • Master Carpenter Videos
    Master Carpenter Videos
  • 7 Trim Carpentry Secrets
    7 Trim Carpentry Secrets
  • All about Roofing
    All about Roofing
  • Clever daily tip in your inbox
    Clever daily tip in your inbox
  • 7 Smart Kitchen Solutions
    7 Smart Kitchen Solutions
  • Tips & Techniques for Painting
    Tips & Techniques for Painting
  • 9 Concrete Countertops Ideas
    9 Concrete Countertops Ideas
  • Radiant Heat Comparison
    Radiant Heat Comparison
  • Magazine Departments
    Magazine Departments
  • Custom Flooring Inspiration
    Custom Flooring Inspiration
  • Remodeling Articles
    Remodeling Articles
  • 7 Small Bathroom Layouts
    7 Small Bathroom Layouts
  • Design Inspiration
    Design Inspiration
  • Energy-Smart Details
    Energy-Smart Details
  • Video Series: Tile a Bathroom
    Video Series: Tile a Bathroom
  • Video: Install a Fence
    Video: Install a Fence
next

Video: Door Installation, Final Air Sealing, and Patching the Siding

Length: 8:04
Produced By: Brian Pontolilo, Justin Fink, and John Ross

I’ve done so much work to get ready to install the door that this ends up being the quickest part of the process. But I do have one last bit of weatherization to do at the sill before I cover it up for good.

I place a rolled-up piece of flexible to keep water and air from seeping between the bottom of the threshold and the sill. A few beads of caulk across the width of the sill aid in sealing and keep the threshold from squeaking.

With the door frame in the opening, I check one last time that it is plumb and square to the opening and plumb to the house. When everything looks good, I peel back the weather stripping and drives fasteners where they won’t be visible. I put screws above and below the locations of the shim screws that he used to plumb the opening. I also drive screws through the casing and plugs the holes.

Before I go any further, I hang the door to make sure it swings properly. Looks good, let’s finish the flashing and wrap this up.

Starting at the bottom of the door and working toward the top, I peel away the paper backing on the back-flashing, and stick the house wrap to it, making sure that each piece is lapped over the piece below it. The back-flashing, which is sealed to the pediment, is woven into the house wrap, eliminating the need for metal cap-flashing.

I install one more round of flexible flashing lapped up and around the door to seal the joint between the house wrap and the back-flashing. It’s completely overkill—but I consider it cheap insurance.

After reinstalling the siding outside, I go inside to finish the job. Before casing the new door, I run a bead of spary foam between the jamb and framing to keep air out.

That’s it. It’s a lot of flashing but I’m confident that this installation is weather and water proof and that this door will be looking good for a long time.